A Companion Guide to Resilience

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Asia is experiencing unprecedented change. Some of these changes are bringing undeniable benefits, such as the millions of Asians being lifted out of poverty by economic growth, and the soaring accessibility of information technology. Other changes are increasing the vulnerability of many portions of the population: climate change, the rapid increase in the number of disasters, political instability, and escalating inequality. Resilience building is increasingly seen as a counter to these drivers of vulnerability. This guide aims to provide practical guidance to staff working on resilience throughout the region. It is intended to be used first and foremost by Oxfam and partner staff who are directly involved in project design and implementation. The guide complements Oxfam’s Strategy for Resilience in Asia for 2015–2020.
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  Practical guidance for people designing and implementing programmes that aim to increase the resilience of people living in poverty Lead authors:  Steve Jennings & Janice Ian ManlutacNovember 2015 Members of duck raisers in Potuakhali, Bangladesh discuss with Oxfam and partners underlying causes of poverty in their village and lack of scale up of this industry which are: a) poor access to business services; b) inefcient supply chain; c) entrenched traditional beliefs that since women are caretakers of ducks, it is just an adjunct household chore and not a viable enterprise; and d) chronic natural disasters and climate variability. Photo: Janice Ian Manlutac/2015 A Companion Guide to Resilience Contents 1 About this Companion 12 Vision 33 Design 114 Implementation 215 Measuring Resilience 286 Learning 32  2 1.1 Introduction  Asia is experiencing unprecedented change. Some of these changes are bringing undeniable benets, such as the millions of Asians being lifted out of poverty by economic growth, and the soaring accessibility of information technology. Other changes are increasing the vulnerability of many portions of the population: climate change, the rapid increase in the number of disasters, political instability, and escalating inequality. Resilience building is increasingly seen as a counter to these drivers of vulnerability. Fortunately, Oxfam and partners in Asia have a rich history of implementing approaches towards resilience that can be built upon to become more effective. 1.2 What is the purpose of this guide? This companion aims to provide practical guidance to staff working on resilience throughout the region. It is intended to be used rst and foremost by Oxfam and partner staff who are directly involved in project design and implementation. It should also be useful for those who support them: their managers, advisors and fundraisers. The guide includes a practical Resilience Checklist of things to consider at project and wider programme levels (Section 3). The guide complements Oxfam’s Strategy for Resilience in Asia for 2015-2020, which was developed to foster a shared approach to resilience amongst all country programmes and afliates in the region, and will normally be used alongside it. 1 ABOUT THIS COMPANION Sharmila Karki, 48, Goma Limbu, 60, and Manju Thapa, 31 work in an onion eld outside an informal settlement in the Manohara area of Kathmandu, Nepal, on August 29, 2015. The women usually work from 10 am to 6 pm and earn 260 Nepali NRs a day - around $2.50. The legal minimum wage in Nepal is 450 NRs a day. Photo: Sam Cunningham Sam Tarling/2015  3 1.3 How is the guide structured? The structure of the guide follows the basic sequence of project (or programme) cycle management: creating a vision, project design, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation. Learning comes from all parts of this sequence. The guide is structured in this way so that people can use the guide to inform their work as it progresses, and nd the parts that are most relevant to their work easily if they prefer to dip in and out of the guide. The sections of the guide are: Vision:  This part of the guide is intended to help you establish the vision and goals for your work on resilience. It contains a brief introduction to Oxfam in Asia’s denition of and vision for resilience. Design:  The guide contains the Resilience Checklist, which is a handy tool that you can use when designing projects or programmes, including writing funding proposals. It also describes the Asia Theory of Change for resilience, a short discussion of how resilience relates to other programme areas, and includes tips and useful resources for designing projects and programmes. Implementation:  The guide contains a number of case studies from programmes around the region to help you think through some of the practical solutions that others have found when programming. It also includes a brief guide on partnerships and donors. Monitoring and Evaluation:  The guide contains a menu of indicators that can be used to develop monitoring and evaluation plans. Learning:  All parts of the project cycle – vision, design, implementation and monitoring and evaluation – provide experience, information and insight that we should be using to improve our work. This section provides information on how to plan and resource learning, and also introduces a ‘feedback loop’ to facilitate learning from work on resilience. LEARNING Planning for learningThe Feedback Loop VISION Oxfam’s VisionTheory of change IMPLEMENT Case StudiesPartnerships and Donors MONITORING & EVALUATION Indicators for resilience DESIGN The Resilience ChecklistCross-cutting issues  4 2 VISION Establishing the vision –what you want to achieve – is a critical rst step in any sort of programming. In practical terms, this means building on the strategic decisions that have been made by Oxfam in Asia so that your own work aligns with the broader work in the region whilst reecting your own context. This section helps to explain what Oxfam in Asia means by resilience, how it is prioritised, and introduces a Theory of Change to help you develop the goals for your own work. Climate change induced frequent and severe disasters have tested the life, sanity and livelihoods of residents of Magurakani Village of Atulia Union, close to the mangrove forest of Sundarban. Cyclone “Sidr” in 2007 and “Aila” in 2009 affected the South-West region adversely through saline intrusion forcing women to look at alternative livelihood such as crab fattening. The women saw crabs as a “friendly” way to produce food and get income for now through aquaculture until the environment recovers and become less saline. Photo: Janice Ian Manlutac/2015
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