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“Allusion in ‘Eveline’” Henke’s discussion of the roles played by Eveline and Frank highlights the extent to which literary allusion is an important dimension of the story. By comparing her to a “Dublin Desdemona”, Henke suggests that Eveline’s predicament can easily be related to conventional images of female passivity where women acquire a mythic or stereotyped status as the victims of male aggression (with clearly sexual undertones, since Desdemona is the victim of her husband’s extreme jea
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  “Allusion in ‘Eveline’” Henke’s discussion of the roles played by Eveline and Frank highlights the extent to which literary allusion is an important dimension of the story. By comparing her to a “Dublin Desdemona”, Henke suggests that Eveline’s predicament can easily be related to conventional images of female passivity where women acquire a mythic or stereotyped status as the victims of male aggression (with clearly sexual undertones, since Desdemona is the victim of her husband’s extreme jealousy).* Henke regards Frank as a version of Odysseus and Sir Galahad, the former because of his legendary adventurousness and resourcefulness, and the latter because of his heroic character and his gallantry. The similarity to Odysseus takes place when Frank tell him all his adventures while was travelling around the world , he was a sailor and he enumerated her how boats he was and he told her tales of distant countries. The diversity of experiences Odysseus had in some way.   The allusion to Sir Galahad can be related perfectly incarnation knightly that this knight has with the pretensions Frank has in order to impress Evelinegiving her surprises like going to the theatre, waiting her when she leaving work, he wants Eveline go with him on boat to be her wife. Henke further develops the idea that the protagonists of “Eveline” contain traces of those in other fictions; according to her, Eveline repeats a pattern generalized in popular entertainments ( a good example couldbe when Frank wants to carry Eveline to the theatre seeing The Bohemian Girl, based on the greatest play La Bohème , whose plot is about a young girl captured by gypsies who discovers she was a princess) that were consumed in mass form in the early twentieth century: “ He took her to see The Bohemian Girl and she left elated as she sat in an unaccustomed part of the theatre with him”. Eveline, then, would have become, in her life, a distorted version of literary heroines, and her character would have been shaped by these fictions’ rhetorical and emotional formulas . S. Henke   thinks that Eveline is like Desdemona (Shakespeare’s Othello) who fetishizes her beloved this way Eveline does with Frank thinking of him like a “bronze-faced prince” and thinks he give her completely bliss. Otherwise, Henkes alludes to Virgin Mary’s because she is willing to do what she was told the same way in which Eveline does it. There would be at least three more specific ways in which “Eveline” could be considered to remind readers of other texts. Firstly, and given what we have learned about the ironic use of the name of Frank, it could beargued that Eveline’s name is also used in an allegorical manner, reminding us of the universal condition ofwoman; The name of Evelin remember us to Eve (from Adam and Eve). Bible character Eve was the first woman, this was who originated the sin in the world. Like in this plot we can see the way in which Eveline is treated could be think that female role is worthless therefore the role of men is more important. So, we can find an allusion where Eve depending on the rib of Adam thanks to himEve was born. The female role is treated like a secondary role, something that just have worth. . Secondly, “Eveleen” is the protagonist of a ballad by Irish Romantic author Thomas Moore, “Eveleen’s Bower.”   ’ Eveleen’s Bower   ’’ was written by Thomas Moore(1779-1852). This ballad was published in 1808. Eveleen is a young girl who wants to lose her virginity with “Lord of Valley” who sings agreeing the fame what Eveleen has, her virginity compared with soon, night and white snow. The strong excited relationship between both, she has given her virginity to “Lord of the Valley”. This example can give us an annotation that it is not good that a young girl have sex with a older men chiefly if the girl give her virginity, it is like Eveline with Frank. Finally, and even more literally, Eveline is the name in the title of a pornographic novel that had been in circulation since the 1840s Eveline , by James Joyce ,,** whose plot revolves around the theme(s) of a young girl who is immersed in a sexual and full of submission life. Although the Evelin’s tale does not change, nothing changes on any part of tale. Evelin is a Dublin Desdemona, she has a conflict desire. She thinks that is her duty to have submission and be docile. Furthermore, she grow up in an iniquity atmosphere where role of men was de only important in her life. Moreover she feel a strong commitment since she did her mother and she fell the need to have the same life that her  mother had. This plot has many euphemisms and imageries which are not good defined but it is full of meaning. This story has an erotic plot where the main character (Eveline) have sexual intercourse with her father. Her sexuality is between her father (who is not appointed) and Frank (her beloved, her bronze-faced princes). This plot are closely related with prostitution, hence his alleged trip to Buenos Aires. Complex life of a submissive young irish girl.Arguably the allusion in Eveline is continuous. The main plot is the sexuality life of woman, her role like duty of women. Her name appeals to important literary and biblical characters such as Virgin Mary’s or Eve. Furthermore, Frank give allusion to Odysseus and important knight of English culture both of them are honest and we can see Frank’s honesty, but his actions aren’t it. She thinks that she is a victim more such as her mother for this reason she speaks with her mind all time. In Blessed Margaret Mary Alacoque we can see the idea of Eveline grief for being an orphan and being surmised to her father sexually. For this reason she does not want to name his father. Patriarchal authority made her can be free. Eveline is the cannon a young girl who loses hervirginity and is threatened like a sexual object, her role of woman must be submissive and docile tothe wishes primarily to those of his father, the role of woman subservient, the beginning of sexual experiences. She is pressured by everything around her. * The text strongly suggests a relation involving physical and sexual abuse by Eveline’s father it said“ Even now, though she was over nineteen, she sometimes felt herself in danger of her father’s violence” it does she is scared.  who is also presented in terms of jealous rivalry against Frank. “Of course, her father had found out the affair and had forbidden her to have anything to say to him.” Because he feel she barely is not his possession. ** The ironic connection between “Eveline” and erotic literature could also be justified if we remember the protagonist’s family name. The name Hill of family give allusion to Fanny Hill   Memoirs of a Woman ofPleasure , by John Cleland, published in 1748. Where Fanny also is a young girl who loses her virginity, this story contains an important hidden erotic and sexual meaning . Fanny wrote letters where she talks about her life and it could be consider like a biographic. Fanny like Eveline have a strong connection between her lifestyle because both of them are submissive sexuality.By: Sánchez Silva, Cristina. Henke’s discussion of the roles played by Eveline and Frank highlights the extent to which literary allusion is an important dimension of the story. By comparing her to a “Dublin Desdemona”, Henke suggests that Eveline’s predicament can easily be related to conventional images of female passivity where women acquire a mythic or stereotyped status as the victims of male aggression (with clearly sexual undertones, since Desdemona is the victim of her husband’s extreme jealousy).* Henke regards Frank as a version of Odysseus and Sir Galahad, the former because of his legendary adventurousness and resourcefulness, and the latter because of his heroic character and his gallantry. Galahad’s gallantry comes from his actions, as he tries to impress her by going to the theatre, showing off or by visiting her: “Then they had come to know each other. […] and see her home.” The similarity to Odysseus is drawn from him telling her his story when he started as a sailor and the many adventures he has lived. “He had tales of distant countries. He had started as a deck boy at a pound a month on a ship of the Allan Line going out to Canada. […] and he told her stories of the terrible Patagonians.”  Henke further develops the idea that the protagonists of “Eveline” contain traces of those in other fictions; according to her, Eveline repeats a pattern generalized in popular entertainments ( an example of this is The Bohemian Girl , the operetta to which Frank takes Eveline, which is based on the bigger play La Bohème , telling the story of girl captured by gypsies who discovers she was a princess ) that were consumed in mass form in the early twentieth century:  “He took her to see The Bohemian Girl and she felt elated…” . Eveline, then, would have become, in her life, a distorted version of literary heroines, and her character would have been shaped by these fictions’ rhetorical and emotional formulas. In the opinion of S. Henke, the main references to Eveline are Desdemona, from Shakespeare’s Othello, which idealises his husband as a hero, as Eveline does with Frank, and the Virgin Mary. This last comparison is established by her obedience to the family without any type of condition, exactly like the Virgin did in the Annunciation. There would be at least three more specific ways in which “Eveline” could be considered to remind readers of other texts. Firstly, and given what we have learned about the ironic use of the name of Frank, it could beargued that Eveline’s name is also used in an allegorical manner, reminding us of the universal condition ofwoman; the first part of the name reminds us of Eve, the biblical first woman. They share the “female weakness” which produces, in the case of Eve, the called ‘original sin’ . Secondly, “Eveleen” is the protagonist of a ballad by Irish Romantic author Thomas Moore, “Eveleen’s Bower.” This poem was published in 1808. On this, the protagonist is Eveleen, who appears to lose her virginity with the “Lord of the Valley”. There is a strong connection between the virginity of her with the snow and the moon, which are covered metaphorically meaning the loss of virginity.  A Selection of Irish Melodies  is the work in which this piece is contained. Finally, and even more literally, Eveline is the name in the title of a pornographic novel that had been in circulation since the 1840s , Eveline , by James Jennings ,** whose plot revolves around the themes of a girl immersed in sexual initiation which even involves episodes of incest. The complexity of “Eveline” is not based on words or the plot, but in the many, subtle and hidden messages that it transmits. Since the title, revealing the name of the protagonist, the journey into double meaning and metaphor starts. This text can be seen as coin, with two faces that do not need to have anything in common. The upper part is an armour to protect the text, in which it tells us a story thatmay satisfy or not the needs of the reader. However, the lower part, the subjacent part, involves the requirement of a sufficient knowledge to understand a series of connotations that come mainly from other works. So, the name of Eveline draws a strong relationship with lost virginity, with sexual initiation and incest. The family name, Hill, also unveils this sexuality beneath this peculiar character. Allusions or allegoric ways of creating characters (as an example of this we can take Pilgrim’s Progress , by John Bunyan) are an aspect which makes the content of the text much richer and entertaining. Also, the irony through the lines of “Eveline”, as it is woven with the allegory and intertextuality, plays a special role to give a characteristic sign to the text.The allusion is one of the aspects that catch a strong attention upon the text of “Eveline”, as it can be found in many parts of it. First of all the similarity between Frank and two heroic characters from both English and Classical Greek literature remarks an important part. This gives the character of Frank a new deeper dimension. Also the literary influence on the characters is developed on the case of Eveline, when The Bohemian Girl  operetta takes part. Furthermore, not only Frank but also Eveline can be compared to other figures, such as Desdemona, from Shakespeare’s work Othello  or even the Virgin Mary. However, the strongest technique seen in terms of allusion is the intertextuality, as it gives a subtle ironic sexuality behind the inability to move of Eveline. On this part is where the name of Eveline takes a special role, as the tradition of characters with this name has revealed a high connection between her and the sexuality, and the sexual initiation. The final highlight is her family name, Hill, which gives the final detail of how related she is to the erotic world. Notes  * The text strongly suggests a relation involving physical and sexual abuse by Eveline’s father : “Even now,though she was over nineteen, she sometimes felt herself in danger of her father’s violence” , who is also presented in terms of jealous rivalry against Frank : “Of course, her father had found out the affair and had forbidden her to have anything to say to him.” ** The ironic connection between “Eveline” and erotic literature could also be justified if we remember the protagonist’s family name. Hill, the family name, reminds us of Fanny Hill: Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure , by John Cleland, published in 1748. This text, through the letters of Fanny, forms an autobiography of her life, with a strong pornographic content. Then the message that this name gives is significant according to her family and herself. The hidden sexual and erotic meaning arises evidently.
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