CONTROL MICROSYSTEMS DNP3. User and Reference Manual - PDF

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DNP3 User and Reference Manual CONTROL MICROSYSTEMS SCADA products... for the distance 48 Steacie Drive Telephone: Kanata, Ontario Facsimile: K2K 2A9 Technical Support:
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DNP3 User and Reference Manual CONTROL MICROSYSTEMS SCADA products... for the distance 48 Steacie Drive Telephone: Kanata, Ontario Facsimile: K2K 2A9 Technical Support: Canada 888-2CONTROL 2007 Control Microsystems Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in Canada. Trademarks TelePACE, SCADASense, SCADAServer, SCADALog, RealFLO, TeleSAFE, TeleSAFE Micro16, SCADAPack, SCADAPack Light, SCADAPack Plus, SCADAPack 32, SCADAPack 32P, SCADAPack 350, SCADAPack LP, SCADAPack 100, SCADASense 4202 DS, SCADASense 4202 DR, SCADASense 4203 DS, SCADASense 4203 DR, SCADASense 4102, SCADASense 4012, SCADASense 4032 and TeleBUS are registered trademarks of Control Microsystems. All other product names are copyright and registered trademarks or trade names of their respective owners. Material used in the User and Reference manual section titled SCADAServer OLE Automation Reference is distributed under license from the OPC Foundation. 1 Table of Contents 1 USING THIS MANUAL DNP3 OVERVIEW DNP Architecture Object Library Internal Indication (IIN) Flags Application Layer Pseudo-Transport Layer Data Link Layer Physical Layer Modbus Database Mapping DNP NETWORK ARCHITECTURES DNP Master and Outstation DNP Master and Multidrop Outstations DNP Mimic Mode DNP Routing DNP Address Mapping CONFIGURATION OF DNP OPERATION MODES DNP Outstation Configuration Configuration Steps DNP Master Configuration Configuration Steps DNP Data Router Configuration Configuration Steps DNP Mimic Mode Configuration Configuration Steps DNP CONFIGURATION MENU Application Layer Configuration Data Link Layer Configuration Master Master Poll 5.4.1 Add/Edit Master Poll Dialog Poll Offset Example Address Mapping Add/Edit Address Mapping Dialog Routing Add/Edit DNP Route Dialog Dynamic Routing Binary Inputs Configuration Adding Binary Inputs Binary Outputs Configuration Adding Binary Outputs Bit Analog Inputs Configuration Adding 16-Bit Analog Inputs Bit Analog Inputs Configuration Adding 32-Bit Analog Inputs Short Floating Point Analog Inputs Adding Short Floating Point Analog Inputs Bit Analog Outputs Configuration Adding 16-Bit Analog Outputs Bit Analog Outputs Configuration Adding 32-Bit Analog Outputs Short Floating Point Analog Outputs Adding Short Floating Point Analog Outputs Bit Counter Inputs Configuration Adding 16-Bit Counter Inputs Bit Counter Inputs Configuration Adding 32-Bit Counter Inputs DNP DIAGNOSTICS DNP Status Overview Tab Point Status Tabs DNP Master Status All Stations Tab Remote Overview Tab Remote Point Status Tabs 7 DNP DEVICE PROFILE DOCUMENT - MASTER DNP DEVICE PROFILE DOCUMENT - SLAVE 1 Using This Manual The manual details implementation of the Distributed Network Protocol (DNP3) on SCADAPack controllers. The manual describes the functionality of SCADAPack controllers under certain DNP network topologies and fully details each DNP configuration parameter available on SCADAPack controllers. Although we continuously add tidbits of relevant information, especially when explaining each SCADAPack parameter in the overall scheme of the DNP3 concept, this manual does not serve as a complete DNP3 Technical Reference guide. The manual is arranges as follows: Section 2- DNP3 Overview provides background information on DNP. Section 3-DNP Network describes network configurations for using DNP in a SCADA system. Section 4-Configuration of DNP Operation Modes describes the configuration guidelines for using SCADAPack controllers in DNP networks. Section 5-DNP Configuration is the complete reference for the DNP Configuration command when selected in TelePACE, ISaGRAF, and RealFLO applications. Section 6.1-DNP Status is the complete reference for the DNP Status command when selected in TelePACE, ISaGRAF, and RealFLO applications. DNP Status provides run-time DNP diagnostics and current data values for the local DNP points. Section 6.2-DNP Master Status section is the complete reference for the DNP Master Status command when selected in TelePACE, ISaGRAF, and RealFLO applications. DNP Status provides run-time DNP diagnostics and status of the DNP outstations defined in the Master station and current data values for the DNP points in these outstations. Section 7-DNP Device Profile Document - Master contains the DNP device profile for SCADAPack DNP master stations. All objects and function codes supported by the DNP master are listed in this document. Section 8-DNP Device Profile Document - Slave contains the DNP device profile for SCADAPack DNP slave stations. All objects and function codes supported by the DNP slave are listed in this document. 5 2 DNP3 Overview DNP, the Distributed Network Protocol, is a standards-based communications protocol developed to achieve interoperability among systems in the electric utility, oil & gas, water/waste water and security industries. This robust, flexible non-proprietary protocol is based on existing open standards to work within a variety of networks. DNP offers flexibility and functionality that go far beyond conventional communications protocols. Among its robust and flexible features DNP 3.0 includes: Multiple data types (Data Objects) may be included in both request and response messages. Multiple master stations are supported for outstations. Unsolicited responses may be initiated from outstations to master stations. Data types (Objects) may be assigned priorities (Class) and be requested based on the priority. Addressing for over 65,000 devices on a single link. Time synchronization and time-stamped events. Broadcast messages Data link and application layer confirmation 2.1 DNP Architecture DNP is a layered protocol that is based on the Open System Connection (OSI) 7-layer protocol. DNP supports the physical, data link and application layers only and terms this the Enhanced Performance Architecture (EPA). In addition to these three layers an additional layer, the pseudo-transport layer, is added to allow for larger application layer messages to be broken down into smaller frames for the data link layer to transmit. Object Library Application Layer Pseudo-Transport Layer Data Link Layer Physical Layer The data objects (Binary Inputs, Binary Outputs, and Analog Inputs etc.) that reside in the master or outstation. Application tasks for sending of solicited requests (master messages) to outstations or sending of unsolicited responses from outstations. These request and response messages are referred to as fragments in DNP. Breaks the application layer messages into smaller packets that can be handled by the data link layer. These packets are referred to as frames in DNP. Handles the transmission and reception of data frames across the physical layer. This is the physical media, such as serial or Ethernet, which DNP communicates. These layers are described in the following sections of this manual Object Library The data types that are used in DNP are broadly grouped together into Object Groups such as Binary Input Objects and Analog Input Objects etc. Individual data points, or objects within each group, are further defined using Object Variations such as Binary Input Change with Time and 16-Bit Analog Inputs for example. 6 The data objects and variations supported by the SCADAPack series controllers are found in the DNP Device Profile Document - Slave and DNP Device Profile Document - Master sections of this user manual. In general there are two categories of data within each data type, static objects and event objects. Static objects contain the current value of the field point or software point. Event objects are generated as a result of the data changing. In addition to the object group and variation data objects can be assigned to classes. In DNP there are four object classes, Class 0, Class 1, Class 2 and Class 3. Class 0 contains all static data. Classes 1, 2 and 3 provide a method to assign priority to event objects. While there is no fixed rule for assigning classes to data objects typically class 1 is assigned to the highest priority data and class 3 is assigned to the lowest priority data. This object library structure enables the efficient transfer of data between master stations and outstations. The master station can poll for high priority data (class 1) more often than it polls for low priority data (class 3). As the data objects assigned to classes is event data when the master polls for a class only the changed, or event data, is returned by the outstation. For data in an outstation that is not assigned a class the master uses a class 0 poll to retrieve all static data from the outstation. DNP allows outstations to report data to one or more master stations using unsolicited responses (report by exception) for event data objects. The outstation reports data based on the assigned class of the data. For example the outstation can be configured to only report high priority class 1 data Internal Indication (IIN) Flags An important data object is the Internal Indications (IIN) object. The Internal Indication (IIN) flags are set by a slave station to indicate internal states and diagnostic results. The following tables show the IIN flags supported by SCADAPack controllers. All bits except Device Restarted and Time Synchronization required are cleared when the slave station receives any poll or read data command. The IIN is set as a 16 bit word divided into two octets of 8 bits. The order of the two octets is: First Octet Second Octet IIN First Octet Bit Number First Octet Bit Description 0 last received message was a broadcast message 1 Class 1 data available 2 Class 2 data available 3 Class 3 data available 4 Time Synchronization required 5 not used (returns 0) 6 Device trouble Indicates memory allocation error in the slave, or For master in mimic mode indicates communication failure with the 7 First Octet Bit Description slave device. 7 Device restarted (set on a power cycle) IIN Second Octet Bit Number Second Octet Bit Description 0 Function Code not implemented 1 Requested object unknown or there were errors in the application data 2 Parameters out of range 3 Event buffer overflowed Indicates event buffer overflow in the slave or master. The slave will set this bit if the event buffer in the slave is overflowed. The master will set this bit if the event buffer in the master has overflowed with events read from the slave. Ensure the event buffer size, in the master and slave, is set to a value that will ensure the buffer does not overflow and events are lost. 4 not used (returns 0) 5 not used (returns 0) 6 not used (returns 0) 7 not used (returns 0) Application Layer The application layer in DNP is responsible for the processing of complete messages for requesting, or responding to requests, for data. The following shows the sequence of Application Layer messages between one master and one outstation. Master Outstation Send Request Accept request and process Optional Application Confirmation Accept response Optional Application Send Response Confirmation Important change detected Accept response Send Unsolicited Response Optional Application Confirmation 8 The complete messages are received from and passed to the pseudo-transport layer. Application layer messages are broken into fragments with each fragment size usually a maximum of 2048 bytes. An application layer message may be one or more fragments in size and it is the responsibility of the application layer to ensure the fragments are properly sequenced. Application layer fragments are sent with or without a confirmation request. When a confirmation is requested the receiving device replies with a confirmation indicating the message was received and parsed without any errors Pseudo-Transport Layer The pseudo-transport layer formats the larger application layer messages into smaller packets that can be handled by the data link layer. These packets are referred to as frames in DNP. The pseudotransport layer inserts a single byte of information in the message header of each frame. This byte contains information such as whether the frame is the first or last frame of a message as well as a sequence number for the frame Data Link Layer The data link layer handles the transmission and reception of data frames across the physical layer. Each data link frame contains a source and destination address to ensure the receiving device knows where to send the response. To ensure data integrity data link layer frames contain two CRC bytes every 16 bytes. Data link layer frames are sent with or without a confirmation request. When a confirmation is requested the receiving device replies with a confirmation indicating the message was received and the CRC checks passed Physical Layer The physical layer handles the physical media, such as serial or Ethernet, which DNP communicates. 2.2 Modbus Database Mapping In SCADAPack series controllers static DNP objects such as binary input, analog input, binary counter and analog output are associated with Modbus registers. Whenever a DNP object is created an associated Modbus register(s) is also assigned. Application programs executing in the SCADAPack controller, C or logic, are able to assign physical I/O to Modbus registers using the TelePACE Register Assignment or the ISaGRAF I/O Connection and these physical I/O points can then be assigned to DNP objects. User application data such as runtimes, flow totals etc. may be also be assigned to DNP objects. This architecture enables DNP master stations and outstations to pass not only physical data points between them but also to monitor and control user applications executing in the SCADAPack controller. For example a master station can monitor a level in an outstation and then, based on the application program, send a setpoint value to another outstation to control the level. 9 3 DNP Network Architectures This section of the manual describes some of the DNP networks in which SCADAPack controllers are used. The network descriptions provide an overview of network. A step-by-step procedure for configuring a SCADAPack for each network implementation is described in proceeding sections. 3.1 DNP Master and Outstation This configuration is a simple DNP Master (Client) and Outstation (Server). The SCADAPack DNP Master may be configured to periodically poll the SCADAPack Outstation for Class 0, 1, 2, and 3 data objects and receive unsolicited responses from the outstation. The SCADAPack outstation may be configured to report change event data to the master station using unsolicited responses. The arrowed line between the Master and Outstation in the diagram below represents a communication path connecting the two stations. This communication medium may be any type that is supported by both controllers, such as direct serial, leased line modem, dial-up modem and radio for example. See the sections DNP Master and DNP Outstation for configuration details on this type of network. SCADAPack 32 Master SCADAPack Outstation A Note: A DNP Master can be configured on SCADAPack 350 and SCADAPack32 controllers only. 3.2 DNP Master and Multidrop Outstations This configuration is a modification of the above example. In this configuration a DNP Master is connected to a number of Outstations. The SCADAPack DNP Master may be configured to periodically poll each SCADAPack Outstation for Class 0, 1,2, and 3 data objects and receive unsolicited responses from the outstations. The SCADAPack Outstations may be configured to report change event data to the master station using unsolicited responses. The arrowed line between the Master and Outstations in the diagram below represents the communication path connecting the stations. This communication path may be any type that is supported by the controllers, such as leased line modem, dial-up modem and radio for example. See the sections 4.2- DNP Master and 4.1-DNP Outstation for configuration details. SCADAPack 32 Master SCADAPack Outstation A SCADAPack Outstation B SCADAPack Outstation C Note: A DNP Master can be configured on SCADAPack 350 and SCADAPack32 controllers only. 3.3 DNP Mimic Mode 10 In a typical DNP network a SCADA Host master communicates with a number of outstations. The SCADA Host will poll each outstation for data and may receive change event data in the form of unsolicited responses from the outstations. This type of DNP network is shown in the following diagram. SCADA Host Master SCADAPack Outstation A SCADAPack Outstation B In the above configuration the SCADA Host manages the communication path with each outstation as represented by the arrowed lines in the diagram. When the communication path is slow, such as with dial-up communication, or subject to high error rates, such as with some radio communication the data update rate at the SCADA host can become very slow. Adding a SCADAPack 32 master configured for Mimic Mode to the network, for instance, allows for the SCADA Host Master to poll the SCADAPack 32 (Mimic Master) for all outstation data instead. The following diagram shows the addition of the SCADAPack 32 master. SCADAPack 32 Mimic SCADA Host Master Slave Master SCADAPack Outstation A SCADAPack Outstation B In this configuration the outstation side of the network has been decoupled from the host side of the network, as the SCADAPack 32 mimic master now manages all the communication with the outstations. The SCADA Host still communicates as before, through one link, targeting each outstation. However the SCADAPack 32 master now intercepts all these messages, and responds on behalf of the targeted outstation. From the perspective of the SCADA Host, the response is coming back from the remote outstation. In order to provide current outstation data to the SCADA Host, the SCADAPack mimicking master independently communicates with each outstation to update a local copy of its database with data from the outstations. This communication may be initiated by the SCADAPack mimicking master, either by polling each outstation in turn using solicited messages; or the outstations could initiate unsolicited messages back to the mimicking master. There could also be a combination of solicited and unsolicited messages between the mimicking master and the outstations. In the Mimic mode diagram above the SCADAPack mimic master polls each outstation, A and B, for data and holds images of this data in its memory. When the SCADA Host poll outstations A and B for data, the mimic master replies from its own images of the outstations. The SCADA Host can also poll the SCADAPack master for its own local data. See Section 4.4-DNP Mimic Mode Configuration for configuration details on the Mimic Mode. Typically the messaging strategy chosen will depend on the relative importance of the data, and the required maximum end-to-end delays for data being transferred through the network. If the requirement is for a reasonably short end-to-end delay for all data points, a round-robin polling scheme is best, without any unsolicited messages. If there are some data points, which are higher priority and must be transferred as fast as possible, unsolicited messages should be used. 11 The advantage of having the SCADA system communicating with the SCADAPack 32 mimic, instead of direct communication to the outstations is that communication delays and high error rates are effectively removed. The physical connection between the SCADA system and mimic master SCADAPack is typically a direct high-speed reliable connection and all message transactions are fast. Outstations may often be connected via slow PSTN or radio links, and therefore message transactions are subject to substantial delays. They may also be unreliable communication links subject to high error rates. By having a multiple-level network the communication between the SCADAPack master and outstations is separated from communication between SCADA system and the SCADAPack master. The delays and error rates, which may be inherent in the outstation communication paths, can be isolated from communications with the
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