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EatingWell Favorite Salad Recipes Orange, Watercress & Tuna Salad................................................................2 Pear-Quinoa Salad....................................................3
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  Orange, Watercress & Tuna Salad ...............................................................2Pear-Quinoa Salad ...................................................3Warm Lentil Salad with Sausage & Apple ........................................................3Chicken Waldorf Salad ...........................................4Summer Succotash Salad ......................................4Curried Salad with Egg & Cashews ...........................................................5Spinach Salad with Steak & Blueberries ..................................................5Chicken & White Bean Salad ...............................6Vegetarian Taco Salad ............................................7Spinach & Frisée Salad with Tangerines & Coriander-Crusted Scallops ............................8Bean & Salmon Salad with Anchovy-Arugula Dressing .................................9Smoky Ham & Corn Salad .....................................9Chopped Greek Salad with Chicken ............................................................10Green Goddess Salad ............................................10 EatingWell Favorite Salad   Recipes TM Spinach & Frisée Salad with Tangerines & Coriander-Crusted Scallops  EatingWell Favorite  Salad Recipes © 2012 Eating Well, Inc. 2 Orange, Watercress & Tuna Salad Makes:  4 servings  Active time:  35 minutes Total:  35 minutes  Heart Health  Diabetes  Weight Loss  Gluten Free  This vibrant salad recipe contrasts flavor, texture and color—the velvety tuna steak is matched with crisp, peppery watercress and the floral tart-sweetness of blood oranges and aniseed. Blood oranges make the dish especially pretty—they’re available Decem-ber through March. If you can’t find them, use any oranges that look good. 3 medium oranges 1 tablespoon canola oil 1 tablespoon rice vinegar 1 teaspoon minced crystallized ginger or   fresh ginger  ½  teaspoon ground coriander ½  teaspoon aniseed, chopped or crushed, divided  ½  teaspoon kosher salt, divided Pinch of cayenne pepper 1-1 ¼  pounds tuna steaks (about 1 inch thick;  see Tip  ), cut into 4 portions  ¼  teaspoon freshly ground pepper 1 cup loosely packed tiny watercress sprigs or leaves (  ¾ -1 inch long)1.  Peel oranges with a sharp knife, removing all peel and white pith. Working over a medium bowl, cut the segments from the surrounding membranes and let them drop into the bowl. Squeeze the peels and mem-branes over the bowl to extract all the juice before discarding them. Gently stir in oil, vin-egar, ginger, coriander, ¼  teaspoon aniseed, ¼  teaspoon salt and cayenne. Set aside. 2.  Position oven rack 5 to 6 inches from the broiler; preheat to high. Cover a broiler pan with foil. 3.  Season tuna with the remaining ¼  tea-spoon each aniseed, salt and pepper. Place on the prepared pan. Broil for about 2 min-utes per side for medium-rare, 4 minutes per side for medium or to desired doneness. 4.  Stir watercress into the orange mixture. Slice the tuna, divide among 4 plates and top with equal portions of the salad. Serve immediately. Per serving:  208 calories; 4 g fat (0 g sat, 2 g mono); 44 mg cholesterol; 13 g carbohy-drate, 0 g added sugars, 29 g protein; 3 g fiber; 195 mg sodium; 712 mg potassium. Nutrition bonus:  Vitamin C (94% daily value), Potassium (21% dv). Carbohydrate servings:  1 Exchanges:  1 fruit, 4 lean meat Tip:  While the issues around tuna are complex, a good rule of thumb is that most U.S.-caught tuna, including Hawai-ian, is considered a good or best choice for the environment because it is more sustainably fished. Look for tuna that was caught with a pole, called “troll,” “pole” or “hook & line” caught. If the method of catch is not on the label, ask your fish-monger how it was caught. Avoid all blue-fin and any species of imported longline tuna.  EatingWell Favorite  Salad Recipes © 2012 Eating Well, Inc. 3 Warm Lentil Salad with Sausage & Apple Makes:  4 servings, about 2 ¼  cups each  Active time:  30 minutes Total:  30 minutes  Heart Health  Diabetes  Weight Loss  Gluten Free  We like the firmer texture of French green lentils in this hearty dinner salad featuring sausage and tart apples. Serve with pickled beets.  4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided 2 tablespoons red-wine vinegar 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard  ½  teaspoon salt  ½  teaspoon freshly ground pepper 3 links hot or   sweet turkey sausage, casings removed 3 cloves garlic, minced 2 cups cooked or   canned (rinsed) lentils (   see Tip  ) 1 small bulb fennel, finely diced 1 Granny Smith apple, finely diced 2 stalks celery with leaves, finely diced 6 cups arugula or   mesclun greens1.  Whisk 3 tablespoons oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper in a large bowl. 2.  Heat the remaining 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add sau-sage; cook, stirring often and breaking up, until cooked through, about 5 minutes. Add garlic; cook 30 seconds more. Stir in lentils and heat through, about 2 minutes. Stir in 5 tablespoons of the dressing and remove from the heat. Stir in fennel, apple and celery. 3.  Toss greens with the remaining dressing. Serve with the warm lentil mixture on top. Per serving:  401 calories; 20 g fat (3 g sat, 13 g mono); 53 mg cholesterol; 32 g carbo-hydrate; 0 g added sugars; 24 g protein; 11 g fiber; 817 mg sodium; 1,011 mg potassium. Nutrition bonus:  Folate (59% daily value),  Vitamin C (30% dv), Iron & Potassium (29% dv), Zinc (26% dv), Magnesium (20% dv),  Vitamin A (19% dv). Carbohydrate servings:  2 Exchanges:  1 starch, 2 vegetable, 3 lean meat, 3 fat Tip:  To cook lentils, place in a saucepan, cover with at least 1 inch of water, bring to a simmer and cook until just tender, 15  to 30 minutes, depending on the type of lentil. Drain and rinse with cold water. 1 cup dry lentils = about 2 ½  cups cooked. Or use canned lentils: 15-ounce can = 1 ½  cups. Rinse canned lentils before cook-ing with them to reduce the sodium by about 35%. Pear-Quinoa Salad Makes:  6 servings, about ¾  cup each  Active time:  20 minutes Total:  40 minutes  Heart Health  Diabetes  Weight Loss  Gluten Free  Quinoa is a quick-cooking whole grain with a slightly nutty flavor—a perfect partner for pears and walnuts in this fresh-tasting salad recipe. The flavor is best when the salad is at room temperature or cold. Refrigerate the salad for at least 15 minutes before serving.  1 14-ounce can reduced-sodium chicken broth or   vegetable broth 1 cup quinoa (   see Tip  ), rinsed if necessary  2 tablespoons walnut oil or   canola oil 1 tablespoon fruity vinegar, such as pear, raspberry or   pomegranate  ¼  cup snipped fresh chives  ¼  teaspoon salt  ¼  teaspoon freshly ground pepper 2 ripe but firm pears, diced  ½  cup coarsely chopped walnuts or   pecans, toasted (   see Tip  )1.  Bring broth to a boil in a large saucepan. Stir in quinoa, reduce heat to maintain a simmer, cover and cook until the liquid is ab-sorbed and the quinoa has popped, about 15 minutes. 2.  Meanwhile, whisk oil, vinegar, chives, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Add pears and toss to coat. 3.  Drain any excess liquid from the cooked quinoa, if necessary. Add the quinoa to the pear mixture; toss to combine. Transfer to the refrigerator to cool for about 15 minutes or serve warm. Serve topped with nuts. Per serving:  246 calories; 13 g fat (1 g sat, 2 g mono); 0 mg cholesterol; 28 g carbohy-drate; 0 g added sugars; 7 g protein; 4 g fiber; 253 mg sodium; 332 mg potassium. Nutrition bonus:  Magnesium (20% daily value), Folate (18% dv). Carbohydrate servings:  2 Exchanges:  1 ½  starch, 1 fruit, 2 fat Tip:  Although quinoa—a grain that was a staple in the ancient Incas’ diet—was once only available in natural-foods stores, it’s now readily available at most large supermarkets and even warehouse stores. Rinsing removes any residue of saponin, quinoa’s natural, bitter protec-tive covering. Most quinoa is sold already rinsed. Check the label to see if you need to rinse before using.  EatingWell Favorite  Salad Recipes © 2012 Eating Well, Inc. 4 Summer Succotash Salad Makes:  10 servings, about ¾  cup each  Active time:  40 minutes Total:  1 hour 40 minutes To   make ahead:  Prepare through Step 2, cover and refrigerate for up to 1 day. Finish with Steps 3 & 4 just before serving.  Heart Health  Diabetes  Weight Loss  Gluten Free  This summer salad is based on the Southern favorite, succotash, and is a fresh-tasting combination of butter beans, corn, summer squash and tomatoes. Butter beans, the same species as lima beans, are the bean of choice in the South. When they’re in season you may be able to find them fresh—shell them yourself. Or use frozen butter beans, baby lima beans or even edamame. 2 cups shelled fresh butter beans (1 ½  pounds unshelled), frozen (thawed) butter beans or   baby lima beans 4 tablespoons canola oil, divided 2 cups corn kernels, fresh (from about 4 large ears;  see Tip  ) or   frozen (thawed) 1 Vidalia or   other sweet onion, finely chopped 1 small yellow squash, chopped 1 small zucchini, chopped 1 clove garlic, minced 2 medium tomatoes, seeded and chopped ½  stalk celery, very finely chopped  ½  cup very thinly sliced fresh basil 2 tablespoons cider vinegar 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 teaspoon salt Freshly ground pepper to taste 1.  Place beans in a medium saucepan and cover with water. Bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until tender, about 30 min-utes for fresh beans, about 25 minutes for frozen. Drain well. Transfer to a large bowl. 2.  Meanwhile, heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add corn, onion, squash and zucchini and cook, stirring, until crisp-tender, 4 to 5 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant, 45 seconds to 1 minute. Add the cooked vegetables to the bowl of beans. Transfer to the refrigerator to cool for at least 1 hour. 3.  When the beans and vegetables are cool, stir in tomatoes, celery and basil. 4.  Whisk vinegar and mustard in a bowl. Add the remaining 3 tablespoons oil in a slow, steady stream, whisking constantly, until the dressing is creamy and well combined. Sea-son with salt and pepper. Drizzle the dressing over the succotash and toss to coat. Per serving:  136 calories; 6 g fat (1 g sat, 4 g mono); 0 mg cholesterol; 17 g carbohydrate; 0 g added sugars; 4 g protein; 3 g fiber; 339 mg sodium; 253 mg potassium. Nutrition bonus:  Vitamin C (26% daily value). Carbohydrate servings:  1 Exchanges:  1 starch, ½  vegetable, 1 fat Tip:  To remove corn kernels from the cob, stand an ear of corn on one end and slice the kernels off with a sharp knife. One ear will yield about ½  cup kernels. Chicken Waldorf Salad Makes:  4 servings, about 1 ½  cups each  Active time:  15 minutes Total:  15 minutes To   make ahead:  Cover and refrigerate for up to 2 days.  Heart Health  Diabetes  Weight Loss  Gluten Free  Leftover cooked chicken makes this chicken Waldorf salad, loaded with apples, grapes, celery and walnuts, a snap to assemble. If you use rotisserie chicken, keep in mind that it’s salty and omit the salt in the dressing. Serve over watercress, with a chunk of whole-grain baguette.   ⅓  cup low-fat mayonnaise  ⅓  cup nonfat or   low-fat plain yogurt 2 teaspoons lemon juice  ¼  teaspoon salt 3 cups chopped cooked chicken breast (   see Tip  ) 1 medium red apple, diced 1 cup halved red or   green grapes 1 cup sliced celery   ½  cup chopped walnuts, toasted if desired, divided Whisk mayonnaise, yogurt, lemon juice and salt in a large bowl. Add chicken, apple, grapes, celery and ¼  cup walnuts. Stir to coat well. Serve topped with the remaining ¼  cup walnuts. Per serving:  356 calories; 16 g fat (2 g sat, 3 g mono); 78 mg cholesterol; 23 g carbohy-drate; 1 g added sugars; 31 g protein; 3 g fiber; 408 mg sodium; 537 mg potassium. Nutrition bonus:  Magnesium (16% daily value), Potassium & Vitamin C (15% dv). Carbohydrate servings:  1 ½   Exchanges:  1 fruit, ½  carbohydrate, 4 lean meat, 3 fat Tip:  The easiest way to cook chicken quickly is to poach it. Place boneless, skinless chicken breasts in a skillet or saucepan. Add lightly salted water (or chicken broth) to cover and bring to a boil. Cover, reduce heat to low and sim-mer gently until the chicken is cooked through and no longer pink in the middle, 10 to 15 minutes.
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