Effectiveness Review: Building Resilience: Eastern Indonesia | Health | Science

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The Building Resilience in Eastern Indonesia project was a three-year initiative that aimed to substantially reduce disaster-related loss, including human life and the social, economic, and environmental assets which the communities it targeted depend on. These full and summary reports document the findings of a quasi-experimental impact evaluation carried out in March/April 2012 in three districts in Indonesia’s Nusa Tenggara Barat (NTB) Province.
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  Building Resilience in Eastern Indonesia 2011/12 EFFECTIVENESS REVIEW SAMPLE 2011/12: BANGLADESH BOLIVIA COLOMBIA DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO ENGLAND ETHIOPIA GEORGIA GUATEMALA HAITI HONDURAS INDONESIA  KENYA LIBERIA MALI NICARAGUA NIGER PALESTINE PAKISTAN PHILIPPINES SOMALIA SOUTH AFRICA UGANDA ZAMBIA ZIMBABWE PROJECT EFFECTIVENESS REVIEWS ‘enhancing effectiveness through evidence-based learning’  The review focused on the work of three partner organisations – Konsepsi, Koslata, and LP2DER – that implemented Oxfam GB’s Building Resilience in Eastern Indonesia programme in 30 villages located in three districts – Lombok Utara, Lombok Timur, and Bima – of Indonesia’s Nusa Tenggara Barat (NTB) province. This programme was a three year initiative that aimed to substantially reduce disaster-related loss, including human life and the social, economic, and environmental assets which the communities it targeted depend. This overall aim was to be achieved by strengthening the capacities of communities and relevant government institutions in disaster prone districts in four provinces of Eastern Indonesia, including Nusa Tenggara Timur (NTT), Nusa Tenggara Barat (NTB), Sulawesi Utara, and Sulawesi Tengah. Figure 1: Location of Sites for Effectiveness Review. Figure 1: Location of Sites for Effectiveness Review. Map from GoogleMaps. https://maps.google.co.uk/mapsPhoto from Oxfam GB country team  Evaluation Method The effectiveness review reports have been shared with Oxfam Indonesia’s eld team and the partners. The ndings and lessons learned will inform a planning workshop in November 2012, so that they can shape Oxfam’s new disaster risk reduction project in Indonesia – Building and Deepening Resilience. This will include an exploration of differences in approaches among the implementing partners, how gender issues can be more effectively mainstreamed, and how greater impact can be achieved at the household level. OutcomeRatingCommentary OGB’s global ARR out-come indicator Strongly signicant and positive results only found for LP2DER. Dimension 1 – Livelihood Viability Strongly signicant and positive results only found for LP2DER. Dimension 2 – Livelihood Innovation Potential Modestly signicant results only found for LP2DER. Dimension 3 – Contingen-cy resources and support access After controlling for baseline information for the characteristics scores, no evidence of impact – either overall or at partner level – was found.Dimension 4 – Ecosystem health After controlling for baseline information for the characteristics scores, no evidence of impact – either overall or at partner level – was found.Dimension 5 – Social Capability Signicant differences between the intervention and comparison sub-villages identied for all partners, but with variation in the magnitude of these differencesFull versions of this report are available on Oxfam’s Policy and Practice website : http://policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/For more information, please contact Oxfam’s Programme Performance and Accountability Team  - ppat@oxfam.org.uk Rating key : - Evidence supporting large impact; - Evidence supporting more modest impact; - Evidence of large impact, but only for specic sub-groups/measures; -  Evidence of modest impact, but only for specic sub-groups/measures; - No evidence of impact ResultsGoing forward To assess the effectiveness of the programme, a quasi-experimental impact evaluation design was implemented. This involved administering surveys to representative samples of 242 households located in 23 sub-villages targeted by the programme and 363 other households located in 23 similar sub-villages in adjacent areas that were not. The households from the intervention and comparison sub-villages were then compared against various outcome measures. Propensity score matching and multivariable regression were used in the statistical analysis of the data to reduce bias. The key area of interest examined was the extent the intervention and comparison households differ in relation to characteristics assumed important for successfully reducing risk and adapting to emerging trends and uncertainty. These characteristics fall under ve dimensions – livelihood viability, innovation potential, access to contingency resources and support, ecosystem health, and social capability. The work of the partners was primarily focused on affecting the characteristics falling under the latter dimension. And there is evidence generated through the effectiveness review that it was signicantly successful in doing so. In particular, both men and women from the intervention sub-villages were found to have a) greater awareness of their respective village’s disaster management plans; b) participated more extensively in disaster preparedness meetings; and c) received more disaster preparedness information. Overall, there is little evidence that the programme was successful in positively affecting the characteristics of the livelihood viability, innovation potential, access to contingency resources and support, and ecosystem health dimensions. This is not surprising, given that this was not the focus of the programme. Nevertheless, there is evidence that one of the implementing partners – LP2DER – positively affected several characteristics falling outside of the social capability dimension.
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