Gender and The Reality of Regeneration: A tale of two cities

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'A tale of two cities: gender and the reality of regeneration' was an inspirational national event jointly organised by Regional Action West Midlands and Oxfam's UK Poverty Programme. It brought to the fore the need to look behind and beyond the banner headlines of regeneration to see how it affects women and men differently. Regeneration is not limited to economic activity. It embraces and is integral to issues of poverty, social inclusion, equality and participation at all levels. The conference highlighted these issues and those relating to quality of life at very local levels through project-based workshop presenters and facilitators. A gender impact assessment framework used by decision makers, funders and delivery bodies, within regeneration policy, strategies and initiatives, is essential to improving the delivery of regeneration programmes across the nine regions of England and the Elected Assemblies of Scotland and Wales. With the assistance of their funders, Regional Action West Midlands and Oxfam's UK Poverty Programme have been able to test and refine approaches to gender impact assessments. This is an important document and I would recommend it to all decision makers and regeneration practitioners.
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  a tale of two cities Thursday 11 March 2004, NEC, Birmingham Gender and the reality of regeneration: Conference report  Organised byOxfam UK PovertyProgramme andRegional ActionWest Midlands   This report was written by Nikki van der Gaag, with assistance from Sue Smith, Jo Rowlands and Sharon Palmer. More copies are available from the Oxfam UK Poverty Programme, or Regional Action West Midlands.  You can download a copy of this report fromwww.oxfamgb.org/ukpp/totc or www.rawm.netFor more information about ordering hard copies, contact:Oxfam UK Poverty Programme274 Banbury RoadOxford OX2 7DZ Tel: 01865 313184Email: ukpp@oxfam.org.ukConference photos by Dave Griffiths  page 3 Contents Foreword 4 Acknowledgements 5 About the organisers 6 1. Introduction 7 2. Regeneration: the context 8 3. Why is gender important in regeneration? 10 4. Why is gender invisible in regeneration? 13 5. Men have gender too 15 6. Building capacity, generating change 17 7. Data driven – the importance of tools and statistics 23 8. Power matters – getting women onto decision-making bodies 27 9. Vision, stamina and chocolate – getting strategic about gender 30 10. Ways forward 35 Postscript 39 Resources and organisations working on gender and regeneration 40 A tale of two cities: conference programme 45 Index of case studies Building on success – East Manchester Beacon Women's Network 18 Women rock! Preston Road Women’s Centre, Hull 20 Raising community spirit – Friends of Jason Group, Cae Mawr, Wales 21  Tools for change – West Midlands Gender and Equalities Programme 23 Gender and Community Engagement Manchester (GEM) Project 24 A story with heart: Black Country Women's Development Network 27 Strength and potential – Sheffield Women's Forum 28 Women's vision, women's version: South Yorkshire Women's Development Trust 30 Going live in Greater Govan, Scotland 31  Thinking gender first: gender mainstreaming in Essex 33  FOREWORD ‘A tale of two cities: gender and the reality of regeneration’ was an inspirationalnational event jointly organised by Regional Action West Midlands and Oxfam’sUK Poverty Programme. It brought to the fore the need to look behind and beyondthe banner headlines of regeneration to see how it affects women and mendifferently. Regeneration is not limited to economic activity. It embraces and is integral toissues of poverty, social inclusion, equality and participation at all levels. Theconference highlighted these issues and those relating to quality of life at very locallevels through project-based workshop presenters and facilitators.A gender impact assessment framework used by decision makers, funders anddelivery bodies, within regeneration policy, strategies and initiatives, is essential toimproving the delivery of regeneration programmes across the nine regions of England and the Elected Assemblies of Scotland and Wales.With the assistance of their funders, Regional Action West Midlands and Oxfam’sUK Poverty Programme have been able to test and refine approaches to genderimpact assessments. This is an important document and I would recommend it to alldecision makers and regeneration practitioners. Katherine Rake, Director, Fawcett Society
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