How Comfortable are you with Poverty in the UK? | Poverty

Please download to get full document.

View again

of 12
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Information Report
Category:

Documents

Published:

Views: 7 | Pages: 12

Extension: PDF | Download: 0

Share
Related documents
Description
The UK is a rich nation - yet nearly one person in five doesn't have enough to live on. Many people can't afford essential clothing - or to heat their homes. Children go to school hungry, or to bed without enough food. 3.8 million children in the UK are living in families experiencing poverty. It's no coincidence that poor communities are in poorer health - and have a shorter life expectancy. It's not just outrageous. It's unnecessary. With enough public pressure for change - and enough political will - our politicians can put this right.
Transcript
  How comfortable are you with poverty in the UK?  The UK is a rich nation – yet nearly one person in five  doesn’t have enough to live on. 1  Many people can’t afford essential clothing – or to heat their homes. Children go to school hungry, or to bed without enough food. 3.8 million children in the UK are living in families experiencing poverty. 2 It’s no coincidence that poor communities are in poorer health – and have a shorter life-expectancy.It’s not just outrageous. It’s unnecessary. With enough public pressure for change – and enough political will – our politicians can put this right. Just ask Margaret, from Thornaby, Teesside (pictured left). Like so many women, her comfortable lifestyle plunged into one of hardship after her marriage ended. While waiting for any money from her divorce settlement to come through, she struggled to survive on a very low income. She frequently went without electricity and gas and faced the threat of losing her home completely. “You feel isolated and vulnerable,” she says. Margaret has worked with poor people in Romania; “Now, I’ve seen the same thing happening right here in Thornaby... to me, as well as to many others. After four years of ever-increasing debts, and finding it hard to meet my everyday needs, I know what it’s like to be trapped in poverty.” Poverty exists in the UK Poverty can happen to anyone    P   h  o   t  o  :   C   h  r   i  s   W  o  r  r  a   l   l   /   O  x   f  a  m 1.  Source: DWP’s revised Household Income Survey 2005/6 (latest figures), based on 60% of median income after housing costs – where housing costs include rents, mortgage interest, buildings insurance and water charges. This is a measure of relative poverty used by most researchers, the EU and the UK government 2.  Source: End Child Poverty, www.endchildpoverty.org.uk  In the UK, people are trapped in poverty by low pay, caring responsibilities, their gender, nationality, or because of where they live. Seventy per cent of children from the Bangladeshi community in the UK grow up in poverty – that’s not a choice. 1  Nor do women working part-time choose to earn nearly forty per cent less than men. 2  Asylum-seekers do not choose to be the poorest people in the UK. 3  Oxfam is working to change attitudes in the UK. Poverty isn’t the fault of the individual. And, whatever their background or circumstances, every individual has a right to be treated with dignity and respect. People don’t choose to be poor     P   h  o   t  o  :   G  a  r  e   t   h   H  a  r  p  e  r   /  m  e   d   i  a  c  o  -  o  p Home truths Mrs Mushaka and her four children came to the UK after they were forced to flee from their homeland. In the UK, harsh restrictions and racist attitudes added to her family’s vulnerability. Asylum-seekers are not allowed to work – it’s the law. Her family has to survive on very little, and sometimes has been made to feel uncomfortable and resented. “People don’t always understand that ‘asylum’ is protection for civilians who are fleeing from persecution and torture,” she explains. Mrs Mushaka is now an active member of the Oxfam-funded Asylum Positive Images Network. It supports asylum-seekers and refugees in Scotland to share their experiences with their communities, the media, and policy-makers. Attitudes towards asylum are now more positive in Scotland than they are in many other parts of the UK.Pictured right: two young asylum-seekers use video to explore their classmates’ views of them. 1.  Poverty and Ethnicity in the UK, Joseph Rowntree Foundation, 2007 2.  Gender Equality Index GB, Equal Opportunities Commission, 2007 3.  poverty.org.uk, New Economics Foundation, supported by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks