howdidegyptianpeoplepreservemummies-alexandracyprarisniti | Decomposition | Water

Please download to get full document.

View again

of 4
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Information Report
Category:

Documents

Published:

Views: 8 | Pages: 4

Extension: PDF | Download: 0

Share
Related documents
Description
How Did Egyptian People Preserve Mummies? Normal decomposition and why: The process of decomposition occurs when bacteria produce and secrete digestive enzymes that break down biological material for consumption. Insects and other animals also help by eating any soft tissue they can access. Several factors affect how and how quickly decomposition can occur. In cold climates, there are very few active bacteria. The water in soft tissues such as flesh or leaves is often
Transcript
   How Did Egyptian People Preserve Mummies? Normal decomposition and why: The process of decomposition occurs when bacteria produce and secrete digestive enzymes that break down biological material for consumption. Insects and other animals also help by eating any soft tissue they can access. Several factors affect how and how quickly decomposition can occur. In cold climates, there are very few active bacteria. The water in soft tissues such as flesh or leaves is often frozen before any animals can get to it, making consumption more difficult. This can greatly extend the time it takes for decomposition to occur, and sometimes even reduce it to zero. On the other hand, areas with warm temperatures and lots of water tend to have higher decomposition rates. Though many bacteria can survive in very harsh climates, those that specialize in breaking down biological matter (decomposer bacteria) generally prefer more mild living conditions with high levels of water and oxygen. Most decomposer bacteria are aerobic, meaning that, like us, they require oxygen to make energy. Even more important than that, however, is water. Most bacteria are over 80% water. they pass the water through their bodies to breathe, move and clear out wastes. Unfortunately, if the bacteria are exposed to too much water for an extended period of time, they may begin to swell and eventually their membranes will burst, causing death. Compositely, if a bacteria that requires even a small amount of water is deprived of it, they will begin to dehydrate. Because the atmosphere itself contains water, there are few places that this can happen. However, it is possible: deserts, such as those found in egypt, get so little water that even the air has no water, and there is absolutely no condensation for the bacteria to use and live in. under conditions such as these, bacteria will experience evaporation and they will shrink and shrivel up until eventually it is no longer able to function and it dies. Process used by the ancient mummies and why it worked: Clean (got rid of/ limited per- existing bacteria) Empty out viscera (lungs, stomach, intestines, not heart ) allowed more ease Wash body with wine (inside and out) Dried out body (bacteria and fungi cannot grow without water) Wrapped in linen ( srcinally would be left in sand and the sand would dry out body leaving natural mummification but later started using sarcophagus so animals wouldn't get in, that caused the body to decay wrapping in linen proved to prevent further decay when dehydrated bacteria can't live) In environments with very little oxygen, such as swamps or peat bogs, often lack the oxygen that most bacteria need to function well, and as such they cannot live there.   Similarly, in areas with low water levels such as deserts, most bacteria lose the ability to move around and dehydrate to death.   Bibliography: Millmore, M. (2017). Discovering ancient egypt. Retrieved February 16, 2017, from Discovering ancient egypt website: https://discoveringegypt.com/ egyptian-mummification/ Mummification. (n.d.). Retrieved February 16, 2017, from Ancient Egypt website: http://www.ancientegypt.co.uk/mummies/explore/main.htmlMummification. (n.d.). Retrieved February 16, 2017, from Ancient Egypt website: Clark, L. (1998, January 20). Mummies 101  [`]. Retrieved February 17, 2017, from NOVA website: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/ancient/mummies-101.html Soils Part 3 - Soil organic Matter. (1999). Retrieved February 17, 2017, from Plant and soil Sciences website: https://passel.unl.edu/pages/ printinformationmodule.php?idinformationmodule=1130447040 Luciani, S. (2014, February 3).  Analysis of bacterial DNA in skin and muscle of the Tyrolean iceman offers new insight into the mummification process . Retrieved February 16, 2017, from Research Gate website: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Stefania_Luciani/publication/ 12673451_Analysis_of_bacterial_DNA_in_skin_and_muscle_of_the_Tyrolean_iceman_offe rs_new_insight_into_the_mummification_process/links/02e7e52ef521393d2b000000.pdf Science Clarified. (2017). Bacteria. Retrieved February 23, 2017, fromhttp://www.scienceclarified.com/As-Bi/Bacteria.html   
Recommended
View more...
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks