I Ask the World to Empathize: Voices of people on the move | Refugee | Yemen

Please download to get full document.

View again

of 22
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Information Report
Category:

Documents

Published:

Views: 5 | Pages: 22

Extension: PDF | Download: 0

Share
Related documents
Description
Worldwide, more than 65 million people have fled conflict, violence and persecution. Millions more are driven from their homes by disasters, drought and inequality. This paper tells the stories of some of those millions of people. Many have relied on local people sharing their scarce resources. In contrast, too many governments have failed to share their resources, and their welcome, in the same spirit. This September, world leaders will gather in New York for the UN Summit on Refugees and Migrants, and for President Obama’s Summit on Refugees. These summits will achieve some, though certainly not all, of what is needed. They will recognize the need to share responsibility for refugees as a principle. The challenge beyond the summits will be to create a radical new approach that builds on this conclusion, and upholds the rights of human beings on the move.
Transcript
  1   www.oxfam.org Voices of people on the move I ask the world to empathize  2 A defining cause of our times Worldwide, more than 65 million people have fled conflict, violence and persecution – the overwhelming majority of whom have not crossed a border. 1  Millions more are driven from their homes by disasters, drought and inequality, or by the desire for a better life for themselves and their families. Labelled ‘migrants’, many of them have become over the course of their journeys as vulnerable as those fleeing brutal conflict. The situation in which all of these people find themselves is the result of governments’ failure to curb conflict, climate change and inequality. But more importantly, they reflect the basic human dream to seek peace, and to provide for one’s family.This paper cuts across the distinctions – of refugee, internally displaced person and migrant – that divide people on the move from each other, to tell the stories of some of those millions of people. Their stories do not come only from Syria or Iraq, but from countries like Niger or Burundi that the world almost always forgets. Some of the men and women telling their stories have found refuge in Europe. But far more have done so in countries such as Jordan and Tanzania which, like other low- and middle-income countries, have welcomed the vast majority of the world’s refugees.The men and women telling their stories have faced intense hardship and often made perilous journeys. Throughout, they have shown incredible resilience, relying on their own resourcefulness and capabilities as they search for a safer future. And they rely on the kindness and solidarity of strangers, on local people who share their often scarce resources with them. Humanitarian aid too plays a vital role. The six largest economies in the world host less than nine percent of the world’s refugees and asylum seekers.   In contrast, too many governments have failed to share their resources in the same spirit of common humanity. They have not shared responsibility for the world’s refugees, displaced people and migrants. While some have risen to the challenge, most of the world’s richest countries have failed to welcome and protect refugees and instead have adopted policies of containment and deterrence towards people on the move. As Oxfam highlighted in July, using UN and World Bank data, the six largest economies in the world host less than nine percent of the world’s refugees and asylum seekers – while more than half have been welcomed by six countries and territories that account for less than two percent of the global economy. 2 Cover photo: Amna fled Deraa in Syria after her son was killed in 2013 and went to live in Zaatari refugee camp, Jordan. Photo: Sam Tarling/Oxfam. Cover quote: Aisha, a Yemeni woman who fled Hardh after her husband and son were killed in an airstrike.  3   I don’t feel good being a refugee.   Aline, who fled violence in Burundi to Tanzania in 2015. Photo: Oxfam For 15 years, Oxfam has carried out surveys of displaced people in many countries, from Colombia to the Philippines, South Sudan to Iraq. One thing it has consistently heard is that their physical safety is the first, vital thing that displaced people are seeking. But they are also   seeking a future with hope where they have a decent livelihood and basic services, particularly education for their children. They want a choice in their future, and they want to live in harmony with the local people who are often hosting them, and who share their struggle to overcome poverty. Above and beyond Oxfam’s work with partners to promote development in some of the world’s poorest communities, it provides humanitarian aid to more than 11 million people in over 20 countries, including bringing safe water to bombarded areas in Syria, providing food in South Sudan, and water and sanitation in many countries including Nigeria, Yemen, Iraq, Greece and Serbia.  4 This September, world leaders will gather in New York for the first ever UN High Level Summit on Refugees and Migrants, and for President Obama’s Leaders’ Summit on Refugees. The two summits provide an unprecedented opportunity for world leaders to step up their commitments to all people on the move. The summits should be evaluated by the extent to which they support people on the move to live in dignity and safety. As this paper shows, they will probably achieve some, but certainly not all, of what is needed. They will lay the foundations for the Compacts on Migration and on Refugees that governments must agree by 2018. The summits will recognize the need to share responsibility for refugees as a principle and adopt a framework response for refugees, but what is needed are concrete commitments to put responsibility sharing into practice. Also, much more must be done to address the plight of internally displaced persons (IDPs), which will be given hardly any attention at the summits. The challenge beyond the summits will be to create a new approach that builds on this conclusion. OXFAM CALLS ON THE WORLD’S PRESIDENTS AND PRIME MINISTERS TO DO THAT, BY: ã Agreeing concrete measures to improve assistance and protection for IDPs and ensure that any support for refugees does not leave IDPs behind. ã Ensuring that vulnerable migrants who do not qualify as refugees receive the protection they need. ã Implementing commitments to support host communities and refugees by ensuring their needs are assessed jointly and that any interventions increase their resilience. ã Increasing resettlement places and expanding other safe and legal pathways to protection. ã Committing to significantly increasing pledges for humanitarian financing, advancing development approaches to displacement, and operating according to humanitarian principles. ã Ensuring refugees and IDPs have access to jobs, livelihoods and education. Looking ahead: after the summits are over 
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks