Missing The Mark: A school report on rich countries' contribution to universal primary eduction by 2015 | Aids

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The Global Campaign for Education is a coalition of NGOs and trade unions working in over 100 countries for the right to free, good-quality, education for all. GCE is a member of the Global Call to Action Against Poverty, the UN Girls' Education Initiative, and the Global Coalition on Women and AIDS. To reach the Millennium Development Goals on education, both developing and developed countries will have to work together to do more, do it faster, and do it better. The introduction to this 2005 report card reviews current aid to basic education against the promises made in 2000, and examines exactly what rich countries need to do to guarantee success on the universal primary education goal.
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    EMBARGOED UNTIL 00:01 HRS EST SUNDAY 17 APRIL 2005 Missing the Mark  A School Report on rich countries’ contribution to Universal Primary Education by 2015  Summary At this defining moment in history, we must be ambitious. Our action must be as urgent as the need, and on the same scale. — Kofi Annan, In larger freedom: towards development, security and human rights for all (March 2005) What you have always declared is that we, boys and girls, are the future. You said it with a lot of enthusiasm, but as soon as you got elected, you forgot about your words. We are not the future, we are the present. — Dante Fernandez Aguilhar, 13, Peru   On a balmy, September day in New York five years ago, heads of state set themselves eight tough goals for ending global poverty: the Millennium Development Goals. Among the most important of these was universal completion of primary education. Free basic education was declared to be the right of every child as long ago as 1948, but this time world leaders vowed to make it a reality by no later than 2015. As a first step, they promised to get as many girls as boys into school by 2005. Education, especially for girls, empowers families to break the cycle of poverty for good. Young women with a primary education are twice as likely to stay safe from AIDS, and their earnings will be 10–20 per cent higher for every year of schooling completed. Evidence gathered over 30 years shows that educating women is the single most powerful weapon against malnutrition — even more effective than improving food supply. 1  Without universal primary education, the other Millennium Development Goals — stopping AIDS, halving the number of people living in poverty, ending unnecessary hunger and child death, amongst others — are not going to be achieved. Rich countries’ aid to education is producing results. Over the past five years, primary school fees have been abolished in many African countries, and as children flood into schools, aid has helped to provide tens of thousands more teachers and classrooms. Africa’s gross enrolments have risen to over 90 per cent and, as a result, an estimated 17 million more children, especially girls, are in school. For only $5.4bn more per year, we could provide a quality, free education to every  child, and unlock the full power of education to beat poverty. This amounts to less than two and a half days’ global military spending. For the price of just one of the Cruise missiles dropped on Baghdad, 100 schools could be built in Africa. 2  It is vital that rich countries should be held accountable for keeping their promises on education. Towards this end, we have produced this report to assess the aid efforts of 22 industrialised nations belonging to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Our report shows that rich countries are still falling well short of the financing targets they set themselves, although some countries, such as Norway, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Denmark, are performing well. The chief laggards are Austria, the USA, New Zealand, Spain, and Italy. Five of the G7 countries are in the bottom half of the class, with a combined grade of 'D'. The two richest countries in the world, the USA and Japan, languish at the bottom of the class, providing less than 10 per cent of their fair share of support to Education for All. Donor nations have launched an ‘Education for All Fast Track Initiative’ (FTI) to ensure that developing countries that come forward with good policies and clear plans for achieving Education for  All are rewarded by increased aid. This is in line with the pledge by donor countries in 2000 that ‘no country seriously committed to Education for All will be thwarted in their achievement of this goal by a lack of resources’. ’ 3  In addition to 13 countries that have already won approval for their plans and started implementation, there are a further 38 countries that could have plans ready by the end of 2006. If all of these plans were funded, the Fast Track Initiative could be reaching 75 per cent of the world’s out-of-school children within the next few years. The Fast Track Initiative has the potential to become an effective global partnership to achieve quality, free education for all, inspiring and enabling dramatically-increased efforts by both rich and poor countries. It is not such a partnership yet: it includes too few developing countries, mobilises too little in additional funding, and lacks clear and certain guarantees from the rich world. Missing the Mark , Global Campaign for Education. April 2005 1  This is the moment for rich countries to launch an ambitious expansion of the Fast Track Initiative by pledging at least $3bn a year to support all 51 of the existing and potential FTI partner countries, as and when their plans are approved. They should also announce a timetable for further aid increases, in order to deliver by 2010 the full $5.4bn needed annually to achieve universal primary education in all 79 low-income countries. Without these steps, progress in developing countries is likely to remain insufficient to achieve the education Millennium Development Goals in the short ten years remaining. To give every girl and boy a decent primary education by 2015, current rates of progress need to double in South Asia and quadruple in Africa.  4  D espite recent gains, over 100 million children are still out of school. The first Millennium Development Goal — equal numbers of girls as boys attending school by 2005 — has already been missed, and according to UNICEF, 9 million more girls than boys are left out of school every year. It is therefore deeply worrying that bilateral and multilateral aid to basic education in low-income countries, although it increased to $1.7bn in 2003, is still only about one-fifth of what is needed. Even the star-performing developing countries are not getting enough resources. Some 40 per cent of the additional aid promised to the first 12 Fast Track Initiative countries has yet to arrive, and they still need another $300m per year to fully implement their Education for All plans. 5  To reach the Millennium Development Goals, both developing and developed countries will have to work together to do more, do it faster, and do it better. That is why we need rich countries to back the Education for All Fast Track Initiative, and pledge enough resources to expand the FTI to all  poor countries that come forward with credible and transparent plans for achieving the education goals. Marks and final grades Indicators (each marked out of 20) Class position Country 1. Meeting the 0.7% target   2. Funding a fair share of access to primary education   3. Committing to co-ordinate for better results   4. Focusing on poorest countries where girls most lack access to education   5. Providing high-quality aid to education Marks out of 100 Final grade (A–F) 1 st  Norway 20 20 20 20 20 100 A 2 nd  Netherlands 20 20 20 18 17 95 A 3 rd  Denmark 20 7 20 20 19 86 B 4 th  Sweden 20 10 15 20 19 84 B 5 th  United Kingdom 10 11 20 17 18 76 B 6 th  Ireland 11 10 13 20 20 74 B 7 th  Canada 7 15 20 13 10 65 C 8 th  Switzerland 11 4 13 15 16 59 C 9 th  Belgium 17 3 9 16 10 55 C 10 th  Finland 10 6 0 17 15 48 D 11 th  France 12 10 7 5 12 46 D 12 th  Luxembourg 20 0 0 11 10 41 D 13 th  Portugal 6 3 1 16 12 38 D 14 th  Greece 6 16 0 0 15 37 D 15 th  Japan 6 2 7 10 10 35 D 16 th  Germany 8 3 7 7 9 34 D 17 th  Australia 7 6 0 10 8 31 D 18 th  Italy 5 0 1 16 1 23 E 18 th  Spain 7 3 6 3 4 23 E 19 th  New Zealand 7 5 0 5 5 22 E 20 th  USA 4 2 2 10 0 18 F 21 st  Austria 6 1 1 0 3 11 F Missing the Mark , Global Campaign for Education. April 2005 2    P  ART 1: O VERVIEW   To reach the Millennium Development Goals on education, both developing and developed countries will have to work together to do more, do it faster, and do it better. The introduction to our 2005 report card reviews current aid to basic education against the promises made in 2000, and examines exactly what rich countries need to do to guarantee success on the universal primary education goal. Missing the Mark , Global Campaign for Education. April 2005 3
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