Relationships between recovery and relapse, and default and repeated episodes of default in the management of acute malnutrition in children in humanitarian emergencies: A systematic review protocol

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This protocol outlines plans for conducting a mixed-methods systematic review on acute malnutrition in humanitarian crises. The review will investigate the relationship between recovery/cure and relapse, and between relapse and default and/or return defaults/episodes of default in the management of acute malnutrition in children under five in humanitarian emergencies. The review will also explore the contexts in which acute malnutrition management programmes were implemented, in order to identify and describe how context influences relapse and default and/or return default/episodes. This review is funded through the Humanitarian Evidence Programme, a UK Aid-funded partnership between Oxfam and Feinstein International Center (FIC) at the Friedman School of Nutrition at Tufts University. The Humanitarian Evidence Programme aims to synthesize evidence in the humanitarian sector and communicate the findings to stakeholders, with the ultimate goal of improving humanitarian policy and practice.
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  Humanitarian Evidence Programme Relationships between recovery and relapse, and default and repeated episodes of default in the management of acute malnutrition in children in humanitarian emergencies: A systematic review protocol  Relationships between recovery and relapse, and default and repeated episodes of default in the management of 2  acute malnutrition in children in humanitarian emergencies: A systematic review protocol Authors Robert Akparibo, BSc, MSc, MPH, PhD  Andrew CK Lee, MBChB, MSc, MFPH MD, MRCGP  Andrew Booth, BA, Dip Lib, MSc, PhD MCLIP Janet Harris, BA, MSW, PhD Helen B. Woods, BA, MSc, MCLIP, FHEA Lindsay Blank, BSc, PhD Michelle Holdsworth, BSc, PGDip, PhD, RD, RNutr. (University of Sheffield, School of Health and Related Research, UK). Contact   Dr Robert Akparibo, School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR), Regent Court, 30 Regent Street, Sheffield S1 4DA, UK  Expert advisors Seth Adu-Afarwuah, BSc, MPhil, PhD (University of Ghana, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Ghana) Mark Manary, B.S, MD (Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, St. Louis Children’s Hospital , USA) Tanya Khara, BA, MSc (Emergency Nutrition Network, UK) Funding This is a report commissioned by the Humanitarian Evidence Programme, a partnership between Oxfam and Feinstein International Center at Tufts University, and funded by the Department for International Development. This material has been funded by UK aid from the UK Government, however, the views expressed do not necessarily reflect the UK Government’s official policies.   Picture Mother and her baby boy at their home in Azel, Niger in March 2015. The Azel Treatment Centre is a small community health centre, largely dealing with malnutrition cases. Abbie Trayler-Smith/Oxfam.  © Copyright  Authors of the systematic reviews protocols on the Oxfam GB website (policy-practice.oxfam.org.uk/publications) hold the copyright for the text of their protocols. Oxfam GB owns the copyright for all material on the website it has developed, including the contents of the databases, manuals, and keywording. Oxfam and authors give permission for users of the site to display and print the contents of the site for their own non-commercial use, providing that the materials are not modified, copyright and other proprietary notices contained in the materials are retained, and the source of the material is cited clearly. Otherwise users are not permitted to duplicate, reproduce, re-publish, distribute, or store material from this website without express written permission.  Relationships between recovery and relapse, and default and repeated episodes of default in the management of 3  acute malnutrition in children in humanitarian emergencies: A systematic review protocol CONTENTS ACRONYMS 5   1.   BACKGROUND 7   1.1   The global burden of acute malnutrition 7   1.2   Defining malnutrition 8   1.2.1   Severe acute malnutrition: definition and classification 8   1.2.2   Moderate acute malnutrition: Definition and classification 11   1.3   Rationale for the review 12   1.4   Aim of the review 13   2.   REVIEW METHODS 14   2.1   Study design 14   2.2   Inclusion and exclusion criteria 14   2.2.1   Population and condition 14   2.2.2   Intervention and treatment 14   2.2.3   Outcomes 15   2.2.4 Study types 15   2.3   Search strategy 16   2.3.1   Mapping the literature 16   2.3.2   Published and unpublished literature 17   2.3.3   Bibliography and database search 17   2.3.4 Websites and Google Scholar searches for non-peer review and grey literature 18   2.3.5   Supplementary searches 19   2.3.6   Contacts with individuals and organisations 19   2.4   Search limitations 19   2.5   Screening studies 19   2.6   Data Extraction 20   2.6.1   Quantitative data 20   2.6.2   Qualitative data 20   2.6.3   Data extraction from programme reports 20   2.7   Data analysis 20   2.7.1   Quantitative data analysis 20   2.7.2   Qualitative data analysis 21   2.8.   Dealing with missing data 21   2.9   Evaluating the quality of included studies 21   3.   CONTRIBUTION OF MEMBERS OF THE REVIEW TEAM 22   4.   CONFLICTS OF INTEREST 23   5.   TIMELINE 24   6.   ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 25    Relationships between recovery and relapse, and default and repeated episodes of default in the management of 4  acute malnutrition in children in humanitarian emergencies: A systematic review protocol 7.   REFERENCES 26   8.   APPENDICES 31   Appendix 1. Title and abstract screening guide for peer review studies 31   Appendix 2. Full-text screening guide 32   Appendix 3. Quantitative data extraction form: key information 33   Appendix 4. Qualitative data extraction form: key information 34   Appendix 5. Quality checklist: randomised control trial studies 35   Appendix 6. Quality evaluation checklist: non-randomised control trial studies 36   Appendix 7. Quality evaluation checklist: qualitative studies 37   Appendix 8. Quality evaluation checklist: systematic reviews 38   Appendix 9. Assessment of risk of bias of randomised and non-randomised controlled studies 39   Appendix 10. Initial search strategy /outputs of Medline scoping search 40   Appendix 11. List of organisations and contacts for grey literature 41  
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