Sida Humanitarian Partnership Agreement Annual Report 2015-16 | Capacity Building | Non Governmental Organization

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In June 2014, Oxfam signed a three-year framework agreement with Sida (1 April 2014-31 March 2017) – the Humanitarian Partnership Agreement (HPA). This brings together all the humanitarian funding that Oxfam receives within one contract and provides the ability to access three years of funding. The overall goal of Oxfam‟s HPA is that 'fewer women, men, and children die or suffer illness, insecurity and deprivation, by reducing the impact of natural disasters and conflict'. There are three components to the HPA: 1) The Rapid Response Mechanism (RRM), which provides surge funding at the start of an emergency scale up for up to 6 months
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    Oxfam GB Sida Humanitarian Partnership  Agreement   1st April 2015 - 31st March 2016    Annual Report     OXFAM Sida Final Narrative Report  –  1 st  April 2015 to 31 st  March 2016 2 Contents   Introduction  ............................................................................................................................................ 3 1.    Aggregated reporting  ................................................................................................................... 3 1.1    Aggregated results per sector   ............................................................................................ 3 1.2   Contribution to the goals of the Strategy for Humanitarian Assistance through Sida  4 1.3   DRR  ........................................................................................................................................ 9 1.4   Environment/climate considerations  ................................................................................ 10 1.5   Early recovery  ..................................................................................................................... 10 1.6   Gender   ................................................................................................................................. 11 1.7   Protection ............................................................................................................................. 11 1.8   Organisational changes, including changes in policies and working methods  ......... 12 1.8.1   One Oxfam - 2020 progress and the Global Humanitarian Team  ...................... 12 Organisational Structure and Change Management  ................................................................ 12 1.8.2   Security Management  ................................................................................................ 14 1.8.3   Counter Fraud  ............................................................................................................. 14 1.8.4   Core Humanitarian Standards  .................................................................................. 14 1.8.5 MEAL in emergencies ...................................................................................................... 15 1.8.6 Partnerships  ...................................................................................................................... 15 1.8.7 Supply and logistics  ......................................................................................................... 17 Section 2: Rapid Response Mechanism (RRM)  ............................................................................ 18 Humanitarian Partnership Agreement Logframe Outcome 1:  ............................................. 18 1. Introduction  ............................................................................................................................. 19 2. Overall assessment of the RRM projects component  ..................................................... 19 3.   Project Summaries  ............................................................................................................. 20 Outcome 2: Planned projects  ........................................................................................................... 27 Humanitarian Partnership Agreement Logframe Outcome 2:  ............................................. 27 1. Introduction .............................................................................................................................. 28 2. Overall assessment of planned projects component  ...................................................... 28 3. Project Summaries for Planned Projects, Year 2  ............................................................. 29 Outcome 3: Strategic Investments  .................................................................................................. 36 Humanitarian Partnership Agreement Logframe Outcome 3:  ............................................. 36 1.   Introduction  .......................................................................................................................... 36 List of acronyms used in the report  ............................................................................................. 39 List of Annexes  ............................................................................................................................... 40   OXFAM Sida Final Narrative Report  –  1 st  April 2015 to 31 st  March 2016 3 Sida - Oxfam Humanitarian Partnership Agreement Annual Report 1st April 2015 - 31st March 2016 Introduction In June 2014, Oxfam signed a three year framework agreement with SIDA (1 st  April 2014 - 31 st  March 2017)  –  the Humanitarian Partnership Agreement (HPA). This brings together all the humanitarian funding that Oxfam receives within one contract and provides the ability to access three years of funding. The overall goal of Oxfam‟s HPA is  that „ fewer women, men, and children will die or suffer illness, insecurity and deprivation by reducing the impact of natural disasters and conflict’ . There are three components to the HPA: 1) the Rapid Response Mechanism (RRM), which provides surge funding at the start of an emergency scale up for up to 6 months; 2) funding for annual „Planned Projects‟ in chronic/ongoing crises;  and 3) funding for „Strategic Investment Projects‟ to enable the pilot and scale up  of the use of ICT in our humanitarian work and to build the capacity of local WASH partners. This report outlines the activities of the HPA undertaken during the period 1 st  April 2015 to 31 st  March 2016 (Year 2). The report is divided into four sections, namely: Section 1, focusing on aggregated reporting, and general organisational level changes; Section 2, focusing on RRM projects; Section 3, focusing on the Planned Projects; and finally Section 4, focusing on the Strategic Investment Projects. 1. Aggregated reporting 1.1 Aggregated results per sector I n accordance with Sida‟s humanitarian indicators , aggregated results per sector are provided in Annex 1.1. These show that a total of 531,475 people have been reached across all projects, of which 259,952 are men, and 271,523 are women. The sectoral breakdown is shown below: Sector Individuals Male Female Sida Humanitarian Indicators WASH (water):  No of people accessing sufficient quantity of water of appropriate quality for drinking, cooking and personal hygiene 342,939 170,427 172,512 WASH (sanitation):  No of crises-affected people using appropriate sanitation facility 127,823 63,003 64,819 FOOD : No of people receiving food assistance 32,269 15,294 16,975 LIVELIHOODS SUPPORT:  No of people/ households with no income sources/livelihood assets provided with income support/livelihood assets 102,886 48,303 54,583 SHELTER/NFI  (Non Food Items): No of people receiving shelter support and NFIs 62.359 29,999 32,360 PROTECTION:  Number of crises-affected children and adults that were able to access protection services (survivors of sexual and gender-based violence, separated and unaccompanied children reunited with their families, children having access to community spaces, detainees visited) 78,112 35,962 42,150 DRR/climate change : No of crises-affected people participating in DRR activities, or response to climate change. (NB non-Sida indicator) 10,365 5,320 5,045 Total beneficiary interventions 756,753 368,308 388,444 Total people reached without double counting 531,475 259,952 271,523   OXFAM Sida Final Narrative Report  –  1 st  April 2015 to 31 st  March 2016 4 1.2 Contribution to the goals of the Strategy for Humanitarian Assistance through Sida Below are some examples of how the Oxfam - Sida HPA projects have contributed to the goals of the Strategy for Humanitarian Assistance through Sida. 1.2.1 Goal 1: Enhanced capacity to plan and allocate resources on the basis of humanitarian needs Oxfam expects staff to use diverse sources and seek the most relevant information available to inform decision-making as regards humanitarian action, but not to delay urgent responses while in-depth assessments are undertaken. All Planned Projects were designed following a comprehensive needs assessment, and were targeted according to identified needs. The predictable funding for this work, through the establishment of the 3 year HPA, enabled investment to be made in the needs assessment stage, particularly for later project cycles. However, in rapid onset emergencies, urgent and immediate assistance begins in parallel with assessments, to ensure its timely delivery is not compromised (following the „no regrets‟ policy).  Early decisions are largely based on assumptions and the experience of staff and partners, information made available by other development and humanitarian players, drawing on Oxfam‟s wealth of knowledge of the country 1  as well as global expertise gained over seven decades of responding to disasters, and accepted international standards. These assumptions are validated as more accurate information from the ground becomes available. Assessment is an ongoing process, and leads to flexible programmes that adjust rapidly as circumstances, and our understanding, change. Some examples of needs assessment processes in SIDA-funded programmes are:   In Nepal (Annex 2.5), following the earthquake on 25th April 2015 and completion of assessments in the highest priority areas, Oxfam extended assessments into Nuwakot on 1 st  - 2nd May, starting work on 3 rd  May, and Dhading from 3 rd - 5th May, starting work on 4 th  May 2 . Oxfam‟s  Real Time Evaluation (RTE) and the Humanitarian Indicator Tool (HIT) concluded that Oxfam made a very rapid initial response, based upon the quality of preparedness measures in place.   In Guatemala (Annex 2.1), as part of the response to the 2014 drought, the following elements were used to identify needs and target appropriate support: information generated by government institutions on families reporting associated damages and losses in basic grain production; identification of areas with a higher level of acute malnutrition cases reported by the Ministry of Public Health and Social Welfare; development of an institutional mapping of local stakeholders that support families on issues regarding food security and the restoration of livelihoods in the area of intervention; field level validation; implementation of filters to remove listed families that did not meet the selection criteria at community level. As a result, the 1,835 most vulnerable families in the 52 target communities were selected, which contributed to achievement of project impacts.   In the response to flooding in Mozambique (Annex 2.3), the RTE showed that overall Oxfam was well prepared to respond, developing its strategy based on utilisation of the early warning instruments (data from the National Directorate of Water, National Meteorology Institute and the updated contingency plan. The support provided was deemed to be timely (within 72 hours of emergency declaration), appropriate and scaled to the context, and of quality that met the minimum SPHERE standards. 1.2.2 Goal 2: Increased respect for humanitarian law and humanitarian principles Oxfam  –  as an international organization with dual mandate  –  both humanitarian and development  –  is committed to alleviating people‟s suffering within the fr  amework of international humanitarian norms and standards, including International Humanitarian Law, International Human Rights Law and International Refugee Law, and is committed to the humanitarian principles of impartiality, neutrality, humanity and independence (see also Goal 7). That said however given the increasing complex nature of the humanitarian emergencies, in particular ones triggered by internal and/or regional conflicts, it is necessary for Oxfam to evaluate the situation in order to make 1  Oxfam as a confederation works in over 90 countries across the globe. As part of the programme planning, the countries are expected to develop country strategies, which are informed by a robust needs and stakeholder assessments at that particular of time, and also predictions of the evolving situation. This enables Oxfam to plan for the future. 2  Oxfam began the response with its own funding sources. Sida HPA funding was used to implement the response starting 10 th  May 2015.
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