Syria Crisis Fair Share Analysis 2015

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Oxfam has calculated that nearly half of the world’s top donors didn’t give their fair share of aid to the Syria crisis in 2014, based on the size of their economies. The numbers of people in need as a result of the conflict in Syria continues to rise, but the international humanitarian response has not kept pace. Now, in 2015 aid actors estimate that $8.7bn is needed to support 18 million people in Syria and neighbouring countries. Based on the size of rich countries’ economies, Oxfam has determined what an equitable share of the required funds would look like for each donor state. So far, for 2015, only the UK has pledged its ‘fair share’ ahead of the Kuwait donor conference on 31 March 2015, and overall appeals are only 9.8% funded. The donor conference is an opportunity to reverse this shortfall. Failure to do so will have a devastating effect on millions of civilians in Syria and its neighbouring countries. Oxfam has developed indicators to help guide the fair level of commitment that each wealthy country should make in 2015 to alleviate the suffering of those affected by the Syria crisis: The level of funding each country makes available for the humanitarian response, relative to the size of their economy (based on gross national income)
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  OXFAM BRIEFING 30 MARCH 2015 www.oxfam.org   Abu Ali and Um Ali fled Syria in 2012. They now live with their family in a tented settlement in Bekaa, Lebanon. With no source of income, they are becoming increasingly worried about cuts to the humanitarian aid on which they rely. Photo: Yasmine Chawaf/Oxfam “   One day, we received an SMS message telling us that we won't get food anymore. The same thing happened with fuel vouchers. In our settlement, only three families received one this winter, while we all did in 2013. ”     SYRIA CRISIS FAIR SHARE ANALYSIS 2015    2 The numbers of people in need as a result of the conflict in Syria continues to rise, but the international humanitarian response has not kept pace. The donor conference in Kuwait on 31 March 2015 is an opportunity to reverse that trend and put Syrian civilians first. Oxfam has developed indicators to help guide the fair level of commitment that each wealthy country should make in 2015 to alleviate the suffering of those affected by the Syria crisis: ã The level of funding each country makes available for the humanitarian response, relative to the size of their economy (based on gross national income); ã The number of Syrian refugees each country hashelped to find safety through offers of resettlement or other forms of humanitarian protection, again based onthe size of the economy.   3 Figure 1 Funding fair share analysis for 2015 This chart looks at the funding committed to the Syria crisis in the first quarter of 2015. Based on an estimated total need of $8.7bn, the analysis shows that only 9.8 percent of the funding needed has been received. 1   Country 2015 contributions  ($m) (Incl. CERF/ECHO share) Fair share ($m) % Fair share contributed  Australia 2.1 116.9 2%  Austria 6.7 45.9 15% Belgium 12.8 55 23% Canada 47.5 178.4 27% Czech Republic 2.6 33.5 8% Denmark 6.8 30 23% Finland 5.3 25.9 21% France 32.8 303 11% Germany 168 438 38% Greece 4.1 33.8 12% Iceland 0 1.6 1% Ireland 7.4 21.5 35% Italy 28.4 253.2 11% Japan 44 573.1 8% Korea, Republic of 2 200 1% Kuwait 0.1 49.1 0% Luxembourg 1.5 3.7 41% Netherlands 13.7 92.8 15% New Zealand 0.9 16.2 5% Norway 7.9 40.3 20% Poland 5.1 104.6 5% Portugal 4.9 32.6 15% Qatar 7.1 47.9 15% Russia 2.0 593 0% Saudi Arabia 2.8 275.5 1% Slovakia 0.9 16.8 5% Spain 18.5 181.6 10% Sweden 13.6 53.3 26% Switzerland 24.9 57 44% UAE 3.7 98.2 4% United Kingdom 320 291.3 110% United States 51.9 2023.7 3% Note: Information is drawn from publically available sources including EDRIS and FTS and checked with government representatives where possible. Australia, Germany, Ireland, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Spain, the United Kingdom and the United States all provided additional data. Key >90% fair share contributed 50  – 90% contributed <50% contributed  4 Figure 2 Funding fair share analysis for 2014 This chart looks at the funding received for the Syria crisis during 2014. Based on an estimated total need of $7.7bn, the analysis shows that 62.5 percent of the funding needed was received by the end of 2014. 2   Country 2014 contributions  ($m) (Incl. CERF/ECHO share) Fair share ($m) % Fair share contributed  Australia 31 109.6 28%  Austria 17.4 41.6 42% Belgium 24 50 48% Canada 150.6 165.5 91% Czech Republic 10.4 29 36% Denmark 63 27 233% Finland 27.4 23.3 118% France 154.3 269.2 57% Germany 425.1 382.6 111% Greece 13.6 32 42% Iceland 0 1.2 0% Ireland 26.2 18.4 142% Italy 130.6 223.3 58% Japan 149.4 516.5 29% Korea, Republic of 5 172.8 3% Kuwait 300 27.1 1107% Luxembourg 8.7 3.9 222% Netherlands 93.1 81.5 114% New Zealand 5.8 14.7 39% Norway 95.3 37.5 254% Poland 17.8 91 20% Portugal 16.1 29.1 55% Qatar 104.4 29.2 358% Russia 46 613.7 7% Saudi Arabia 172 159.2 108% Slovakia 3.0 14.9 20% Spain 69.2 166.4 42% Sweden 67.0 46.9 143% Switzerland 61.9 50.2 123% UAE 275.7 70.6 391% United Kingdom 432.2 260.1 166% United States 1727.7 1772.4 97% Note: Information is drawn from publically available sources including EDRIS and FTS and checked with government representatives where possible. Australia, Belgium, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Qatar, Russia, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and the United Kingdom all provided additional data. Key >90% fair share contributed 50  – 90% contributed <50% contributed
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