The Disaster Crunch Model: Guidelines for a Gendered Approach | Climate Resilience | Gender

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Globally disasters are occurring more often and in larger scale. Many policies and measures have been developed to analyse their causes and consequences, in order to strengthen the resilience of individuals, communities and institutions. Such measures and policies often disregard that the effects of disasters are likely to be different for women, men, girls and boys. Women’s and men’s (of whatever age) different roles, responsibilities, and access to resources influence how each will be affected by different hazards, and how they will cope with and recover from disaster. Inequality between women and men means that, despite the incredible resilience and capacity for survival that women often exhibit in the face of disaster, they also experience gender-specific vulnerabilities. The “disaster pressure and release model” also known as the disaster “crunch model”, helps practitioners to understand and react to people’s vulnerability to disasters. The current Guidelines introduce new elements into the ‘crunch model’ so that it is able to take into consideration how women and men experience different levels and types of vulnerability to disasters. This booklet is intended for practitioners and researchers engaged in disaster risk reduction (DRR) work in the context of a changing climate.
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  The Disaster Crunch Model: Guidelines for a Gendered Approach  © Oxfam GB May 2012The  Disaster Crunch Model: Guidelines for a Gendered  Approach  was written by Vu Minh Hai and Ines Smyth. Oxfam GB acknowledges the assistance of Dow Punpiputt in its production. These Guidelines should be considered as a working document and will be improved with inputs from field experiences by practitioners. Your comments or inputs are highly appreciated. Please send them to Ines Smyth: ismyth@oxfam.org.ukThis publication is copyright but the text may be used free of charge for the purposes of advocacy, campaigning, education, and research, provided that the source is acknowledged in full. The copyright holder requests that all such use be registered with them for impact assessment purposes. For copying in any other circumstances, or for re-use in other publications, or for translation or adaptation, permission must be secured and a fee may be charged. E-mail policyandpractice@oxfam.org.uk.The information in this publication is correct at the time of going to press. Published by Oxfam GB under ISBN 978-1-78077-140-3 in May 2012. Oxfam GB, Oxfam House, John Smith Drive, Cowley, Oxford, OX4 2JY, UK. OXFAM Oxfam is a registered charity in England and Wales (no 202918) and Scotland (SC039042). Oxfam GB is a member of Oxfam International. Oxfam is an international confederation of 17 organisations networked together in 92 countries, as part of a global movement for change, to build a future free from the injustice of poverty.www.oxfam.org.uk  INTRODUCTION Globally disasters are occurring more often and in larger scale. Many policies and measures have been developed to analyse their causes and consequences, in order to strengthen the resilience of individuals, communities and institutions.Such measures and policies often disregard that the effects of disasters are likely to be different for women, men, girls and boys. Women’s and men’s (of whatever age) different roles, responsibilities, and access to resources influence how each will be affected by different hazards, and how they will cope with and recover from disaster. Inequality between women and men means that, despite the incredible resilience and capacity for survival that women often exhibit in the face of disaster, they also experience gender-specific vulnerabilities. For this reason, understanding how gender relations shape women’s and men’s lives and translating this understanding into appropriate practices, is critical to disaster risk reduction (DRR). The Hyogo Declaration, which sets out the Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA) (2005–2015), states that a gender perspective should be integrated into all DRR policies, plans and decision-making processes.The “Disaster Pressure and Release Model” also known as the disaster “Crunch Model”, helps practitioners to understand and react to people’s vulnerability to disasters. The current Guidelines introduce new elements into the ‘Crunch Model’ so that it is able to take into consideration how women and men experience different levels and types of vulnerability to disasters. This booklet is intended for practitioners and researchers engaged in disaster risk reduction (DRR) work in the context of a changing climate.Photo credit: Ruby Thursday More/Oxfam  contents PART A - ENGENDERING THE ‘CRUNCH MODEL’ PART B - HOW TO USE THE ‘GENDERED CRUNCH MODEL’ PART C - DISASTER RELEASE MODEL: GUIDANCE ON HOW TO COUNTER DISASTER RISK PART D  - CONCLUSIVE NOTES 58 1214
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