Transatlantica 7084 2 About a Photograph New York 1967 by Garry Winogrand | Photography

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About a Photograph New York 1967
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  Transatlantica 2 (2014)Aesthetics of Theory in the Modern Era and Beyond / Photographie documentaire ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Tod Papageorge About a Photograph: New York, 1967,by Garry Winogrand ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Avertissement Le contenu de ce site relève de la législation française sur la propriété intellectuelle et est la propriété exclusive del'éditeur.Les œuvres figurant sur ce site peuvent être consultées et reproduites sur un support papier ou numérique sousréserve qu'elles soient strictement réservées à un usage soit personnel, soit scientifique ou pédagogique excluanttoute exploitation commerciale. La reproduction devra obligatoirement mentionner l'éditeur, le nom de la revue,l'auteur et la référence du document. Toute autre reproduction est interdite sauf accord préalable de l'éditeur, en dehors des cas prévus par la législationen vigueur en France.Revues.org est un portail de revues en sciences humaines et sociales développé par le Cléo, Centre pour l'éditionélectronique ouverte (CNRS, EHESS, UP, UAPV). ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Référence électronique Tod Papageorge, « About a Photograph: New York, 1967, by Garry Winogrand », Transatlantica  [En ligne], 2 | 2014,mis en ligne le 06 janvier 2015, consulté le 11 janvier 2016. URL : http://transatlantica.revues.org/7084Éditeur : Association française d'études américaines (AFEA)http://transatlantica.revues.orghttp://www.revues.orgDocument accessible en ligne sur :http://transatlantica.revues.org/7084Document généré automatiquement le 11 janvier 2016. La pagination ne correspond pas à la pagination de l'éditionpapier. Tous droits réservés  About a Photograph: New York, 1967, by Garry Winogrand2 Transatlantica, 2 | 2014 Tod Papageorge About a Photograph: New York, 1967, byGarry Winogrand 1 I first met Garry Winogrand at the beginning of 1966. Although I was a dozen years youngerthan he was, we quickly became close friends and, soon enough, were photographing togetheron the streets of New York. In the beginning, I found this a little strange; for me, makingphotographs was something to be done in private, if only because it required such tremendousconcentration to have any hope of doing it well. But I soon realized that meeting with Garryand walking the streets with him didn’t mean that I would have to give up the idea of workingautonomously: we simply spread out, typically separated by about half a city block, andworked independently. Manhattan was rich enough in photographic possibility that neitherone of us felt constrained by the other: there was more than enough to see and be excited by.And then, every once in a while, we could stop and have coffee together and indulge in thepleasure of talking about what we’d seen, usually in the Museum of Modern Art café. 2 And so, one Sunday, on an early spring day about a year after we’d met, Garry and Ifound ourselves walking through the Central Park Zoo. I was 20 or 30 yards ahead of himwhen I noticed a handsome couple walking toward me—they looked like fashion models, intheir 20s, both well-dressed—improbably walking with a pair of chimpanzees who were asimmaculately attired as they were (the animals even wore shoes and socks). A New York Citypiece of strangeness, it seemed to me, strange enough to take a picture. So I did.  About a Photograph: New York, 1967, by Garry Winogrand3 Transatlantica, 2 | 2014 1. Tod Papageorge, “New York, 1967.” Credit Tod Papageorge 3 Then, bang!, I felt myself being pushed in the back away from this odd little group. A realshove, unfriendly, hard. And, of course, it was Garry, camera already up, making pictures,who’d done it.  About a Photograph: New York, 1967, by Garry Winogrand4 Transatlantica, 2 | 2014 2. Gary Winogrand, Central Park Zoo, New York, 1967.Collection of Randi and Bob Fisher© The Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco Photo: Don Ross 4 Obviously, he was seeing something that I hadn’t seen, and what he was seeing was importantenough to him that he was willing—for the first and only time in all the years that I knew him—to aggressively lay hands on me. I was shocked, of course, but once I saw that Garry, andnot one of the Sunday strollers rushing by me, was responsible, I forgot about being angry oreven irritated: he was my friend, I rationalized immediately, and must have had his reasonsfor momentarily acting as if he’d never seen me before. 5 By now, both chimpanzees were off the ground (as my picture shows, one had been toddlingbetween the couple when I first saw the group), and I finally noticed that the man in the littlequartet was black, and the woman white and blonde. I’d already recorded that fact with myeyes, I’m sure, but what it may have meant, or could mean, in a photograph, was somethingI hadn’t had the time or the consciousness to process. 6 Garry Winogrand, however, had   obviously processed the fact: where I saw only the possibilityfor a joke that, at best, touched on the crazy-quilt nature of city life, you could say that Garry,by not so much seeing the group itself but instantaneously imagining a possible photographof it, placed meaning, particularly as it might gather around the question of race, at the verycenter of what he was doing. 7 In other words, quite apart from whatever Sunday pleasure or notion of self-advertising hadactually brought that couple together with those two animals, Garry’s quick mind construedfrom their innocent adjacency a picture (or the projection of one) that could suggest theimprobable price that the two races, black and white, might have to pay by mixing together.He was speculating, of course, playing an artistic hunch, but a large and important enough onethat he felt it was worth pushing his friend aside for. So he did what he had to do, and then,a moment later, I answered by making a picture of him standing by the same family group asthey continued their stroll through the zoo.
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