Underachievers: A school report on rich countries' contribution to universal primary eduction by 2015 | Millennium Development Goals

Please download to get full document.

View again

of 32
All materials on our website are shared by users. If you have any questions about copyright issues, please report us to resolve them. We are always happy to assist you.
Information Report
Category:

Documents

Published:

Views: 9 | Pages: 32

Extension: PDF | Download: 0

Share
Related documents
Description
Recent history is littered with noble promises to the world's children. Education For All is an affordable and achievable goal, yet even primary schooling is still out of reach for over 100 million girls and boys. For these children, gaining an education representstheir only chance to lift themselves out of poverty and realize a host of rights that thosefortunate enough to be born in the rich nations of the world take for granted. In recent years, poor countries have shown themselves increasingly committed to breakingdown barriers to poor children's participation, taking the bold step of abolishing tuitionfees for schooling. In 2000, at the World Conference on Education for All in Dakar, Senegal, rich countries declared that no countries seriously committed to education for all will be thwarted in their achievement of this goal by a lack of resources . Yet, in 2006, following repeated pledges, assurances and undertakings, rich nations are still failing to fulfil their part in the contract. The time for action is now. It should not be forgotten that the goal set in 2000 was for allchildren to complete a primary education by 2015. This means that the world has just twomore years to build schools, recruit teachers and reach out to poor excluded children livingin the most trying of circumstances. This is not about money, it is about justice. It is aboutkeeping our word to the world's children. A promise to a child should never be broken.
Transcript
  Underachievers  A School Report on Rich Countries’ Contribution to Universal Primary Education by 2015  September 2006  2   School Report 2006 Global Campaign for Education “Minister – have you asked me what I need as a pupil? As  you sit condently in front of others do you think of what I need to also sit in that chair in future?”  Lusibilo, Malawian schoolchild, to the Malawian Minister of Education “Last year we made great strides in the fight against  poverty... now the more difficult task begins to make the world keep its promises. Promises to children should never be broken.”  Nelson Mandela, 10th April 2006 Recent history is littered with noble promises to the world’s children. Education For All is an affordable and achievable goal, yet even primary schooling is still out of reach for over 100 million girls and boys. The vast majority live in poor countries, and are desperately in need of the light and hope that learning offers. For these children, gaining an education represents their only chance to lift themselves out of poverty and realise a host of rights that those fortunate enough to be born in the rich nations of the world take for granted. In recent years, poor countries have shown themselves increasingly committed to ending the scourge of illiteracy and ignorance. More and more governments are making efforts to break down barriers to poor children’s participation, taking the bold step of abolishing tuition fees for schooling. Budgets for primary education are increasing, particularly in some of the very poorest nations. And efforts are paying off; since 1998, primary school enrolment has increased in both sub-Saharan Africa and South and West Asia, with nearly 20 million new students in each region. Girls’ enrolment in those regions has risen especially quickly. In 2000, at the World Conference on Education for All in Dakar, Senegal, rich countries struck a bargain with their counterparts in poorer nations. They declared that “no countries seriously committed to education for all will be thwarted in their achievement of this goal by a lack of resources”. Yet, in 2006, following repeated pledges, assurances and undertakings, rich nations are still failing to fulfil their part in the contract. The latest figures show that bilateral aid to basic education increased to $3.3 billion per year, with a bigger share of this going to poor countries. This is undeniable progress, and has changed the lives of millions of poor people. Yet it still leaves an annual gap of at least $3.7 billion in desperately-needed resources, and very likely more. Recent estimates suggest that the total external requirement may be as much as $10 billion per annum, taking into account the slow pace of progress so far, realistic economic growth targets and the challenges of HIV/AIDS and conflict. This report shows that some countries, such as Norway, Sweden, Denmark, Luxembourg and the Netherlands make heroic efforts in contributing their fair share of aid and ensuring it helps get poor children into school. The UK government has recently taken steps to improve its record in this area, promising to provide $16 billion in aid to basic education between now and 2015. This sets a standard for other G8 nations to live up to. At the other end of the scale, some of the very richest countries, G8 nations such as Japan, Italy, Germany and the USA, show themselves to be misers when it comes to helping the world’s poor children. Summary    School Report 2006 Global Campaign for Education   3 Underachievers: Summary Money is needed not for luxury items, but for the very basics of education. It should be used to enable children to be taught by a caring qualified teacher, in a proper classroom, using textbooks and other learning materials. Between now and 2015, at least 18 million teachers will be needed to give all a chance of real learning. Our analysis shows that the practice of tying aid to the purchase of goods and services from the srcinating country and the use of expensive consultants remains a problem. Very few countries prove themselves willing to help countries meet the running costs of education – especially the teacher salary bill. This problem is exacerbated by the undermining of the teaching profession by international financial institutions. Rich countries and the international financial institutions must work together to ensure that predictable resources are available over the long-term to employ these indispensable professionals. Equally concerning is that our analysis shows that the Education For All Fast Track Initiative (FTI), a flagship scheme set up under G8 auspices to make the global compact envisaged at Dakar a reality, remains fragile. This innovative initiative has so far encouraged 20 countries to devise strategies and reallocate domestic resources to achieve universal primary completion and gender equality in education. They did so, on the promise that additional financing would be forthcoming to deliver their goals. Although some resources have been mobilised behind these plans, these pioneering countries still face a collective annual shortfall in funding of some $415 million. As a result, plans to reach 16 million of the world’s out-of-school children are kept in limbo. Another 40 countries could be ready to go for FTI endorsement within the next two years, but will scarcely do so with confidence given the experience of the first few. Rich countries must aim higher and work together better to give every boy and girl their right to an education. They should set timetables for achieving the aid target of 0.7% GNI, and ensure that this aid, together with full debt cancellation, targets low-income countries and funds their basic education strategies. Donors and international institutions should work together to ensure that more money is available for the core expenses of building a robust education system, including paying teachers’ salaries. To encourage ambitious planning, aid should be long-term and predictable. The FTI should be the centrepiece of efforts to achieve Education For All. The immediate financing gap must be closed as a matter of urgency, and rich countries should make advance commitments to fund the forthcoming plans of up to 40 countries. The time for action is now. It should not be forgotten that the goal set in 2000 was for all children to complete a primary education by 2015. This means that the world has just two more years to build schools, recruit teachers and reach out to poor excluded children living in the most trying of circumstances. This is not about money, it is about justice. It is about keeping our word to the world’s children. A promise to a child should never be broken. “We will have time to reach the Millennium Development Goals – but only if we break with business as usual….  Nothing less will help to achieve the Goals.”  Kofi Annan  4   School Report 2006 Global Campaign for Education “Last year we made great strides in the fight against  poverty... now the more difficult task begins to make the world keep its promises. Promises to children should never be broken.”  Nelson Mandela, 10th April 2006 1 Recent history is littered with noble promises to the world’s children. Education is the key to eliminating poverty and giving poor people the power to change their own lives. Its crucial importance is reflected in the fact that the right to basic education was enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. At impressive World Education Conferences in 1990 and again in 2000 leaders proclaimed their supposed commitment to enabling all to benefit from the light and hope that education brings – culminating in the agreement of the Education For All (EFA) targets  i . In September 2000, world leaders again acknowledged the critical role of education when they incorporated two of these into the Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s)  ii .Six years later, universal primary schooling has only been achieved in 50 countries in the world leaving over 100 million children out of school 2 . The majority of these children are girls – meaning that the first EFA and MDG target of achieving gender equality in schooling has been missed. Almost 800 million adults live without basic literacy skills 3 . More than 90 countries charge fees for primary schooling and the world needs an estimated 18 million teachers 4  to ensure that when children reach school, they are taught in a reasonable class size and by a qualified professional. 14 million children have lost one or both parents to HIV/AIDS – these children desperately need the stability that school offers, but are far more likely to stay away or drop out. This day and every day, over 111 million children under the age of 15 will labour in the harshest and most hazardous conditions, instead of going to school. 5  This day and every day, over 2,700 children under the age of five will die needlessly because their mothers were denied an education earlier in life. Nearly 2,000 more young people will become infected with HIV/AIDS, who would have stayed safe if they had received a primary school education 6 . This day, and every day that goes by without concerted action to achieve the education goals, 57 million girls will be denied the chance to open their minds and change their destiny through the empowering force of education. “Emancipation lies through the school gates” Marten Kircz, General Education Union, Senegal Children left out of school are those like 11 year old Musharad, who stitches footballs for  just 10 rupees (20 cents) a day, working through bruises, wounds and sores caused by close needlework. Musharad has never gone to school, because her family could not get her into government school and cannot afford to send the children to private school. Now the entire family is engaged in football stitching to feed itself and survive 7 . i The Education For All (EFA) goals committed governments to achieving the following goals by 2015: ã expand early childhood care and education; ã ensure all children, particularly girls, complete free and compulsory, good quality primary education; ã ensure equal access to learning and life-skills training for young people and adults; ã achieve a 50% improvement in adult literacy rates; ã achieve gender equality in primary and secondary education; and ã improve the quality of education – especially in literacy, numeracy and essential life skills. ii The education related Millennium Development Goals (MDG’s) aim to: ã Ensure that, by 2015, children everywhere, boys and girls alike, will be able to complete a full course of primary schoolingã Eliminate gender disparity in primary and secondary education preferably by 2005 and to all levels of education no later than 2015  Introduction Nelson Mandela meets GCE campaigners, Mozambique
Recommended
View more...
We Need Your Support
Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in our free products and services. We are nonprofit website to share and download documents. To the running of this website, we need your help to support us.

Thanks to everyone for your continued support.

No, Thanks